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Analysis of bulk RNA-seq data Wed 25 Mar 2020   09:30 [Full]

The aim of this course is to familiarize the participants with the primary analysis of RNA-seq data.

This course starts with a brief introduction to RNA-seq and discusses quality control issues. Next, we will present the alignment step, quantification of expression and differential expression analysis. For downstream analysis we will focus on tools available through the Bioconductor project for manipulating and analysing bulk RNA-seq.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Analysis of DNA Methylation using Sequencing Wed 20 Nov 2019   09:30 Finished

This course will cover all aspects of the analysis of DNA methylation using sequencing, including primary analysis, mapping and quality control of BS-Seq data, common pitfalls and complications.

It will also include exploratory analysis of methylation, looking at different methods of quantitation, and a variety of ways of looking more widely at the distribution of methylation over the genome. Finally the course will look at statistical methods to predict differential methylation.

The course will be comprised of a mixture of theoretical lectures and practicals covering a range of different software packages.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

This advanced course will cover high-throughput sequencing data processing, ChIP-seq data analysis (including alignment, peak calling), differences in analyses methods for transcription factors (TF) binding and epigenomic datasets, a range of downstream analysis methods for extracting meaningful biology from ChIP-seq data and will provide an introduction to the analysis of open chromatin with ATAC-seq and long-distance interactions with chromosomal conformation capture based Hi-C datasets.

Materials for this course can be found here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

This course provides an introduction to the tools available through the Bioconductor project for manipulating and analysing high-throughput sequencing (HTS) data. We will present workflows for the analysis of ChIP-Seq and RNA-seq data starting from aligned reads in bam format. We will also describe the various resources available through Bioconductor to annotate and visualize HTS data, which can be applied to any type of sequencing experiment.

The course timetable is available here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Analysis of mapped NGS data with SeqMonk Wed 3 Feb 2016   09:30 Finished

SeqMonk is a graphical program for the visualisation and analysis of large mapped sequencing datasets such as ChIP-Seq, RNA-Seq, and BS-Seq.

The program allows you to view your reads against an annotated genome and to quantitate and filter your data to let you identify regions of interest. It is a friendly way to explore and analysis very large datasets.

This course provides an introduction to the main features of SeqMonk and will run through the analysis of a couple of different datasets to show what sort of analysis options it provides.

Further information is available here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Analysis of RNA-seq data with Bioconductor Wed 28 Mar 2018   09:30 Finished

This course provides an introduction to the tools available through the Bioconductor project for manipulating and analysing bulk RNA-seq data. We will present a workflow for the analysis RNA-seq data starting from aligned reads in bam format and producing a list of differentially-expressed genes. We will also describe the various resources available through Bioconductor to annotate, visualise and gain biological insight from the differential expression results.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Analysis of single cell RNA-seq data Mon 16 Dec 2019   09:30 [Full]

Recent technological advances have made it possible to obtain genome-wide transcriptome data from single cells using high-throughput sequencing (scRNA-seq). Even though scRNA-seq makes it possible to address problems that are intractable with bulk RNA-seq data, analysing scRNA-seq is also more challenging.

In this course we will be surveying the existing problems as well as the available computational and statistical frameworks available for the analysis of scRNA-seq.

The course website providing links to the course materials can be found here.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Analysis of small RNA-seq data new Tue 2 May 2017   09:30 Finished

This course focuses on methods for the analysis of small non-coding RNA data obtained from high-throughput sequencing (HTS) applications (small RNA-seq). During the course, approaches to the investigation of all classes of small non-coding RNAs will be presented, in all organisms.

Day 1 will focus on the analysis of microRNAs and day 2 will cover the analysis of other types of small RNAs, including Piwi-interacting (piRNA), small interfering (siRNA), small nucleolar (snoRNA) and tRNA-derived (tsRNA).

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Through the use of real world examples and the JMP, JMP Pro, and JMP Genomics software, we will cover best practices used in both industry and academia today to visually explore data, plan biological experiments, detect differential expression patterns, find signals in next-generation sequencing data and easily discover statistically appropriate biomarker profiles and patterns.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

An Introduction to Machine Learning Wed 19 Feb 2020   09:30 [Full]

Machine learning gives computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed. It encompasses a broad range of approaches to data analysis with applicability across the biological sciences. Lectures will introduce commonly used algorithms and provide insight into their theoretical underpinnings. In the practicals students will apply these algorithms to real biological data-sets using the R language and environment.

Please be aware that the course syllabus is currently being updated following feedback from the last event; therefore the agenda below will be subjected to changes.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

An Introduction to MATLAB for biologists Mon 17 Jun 2019   09:30 Finished

This course aims to give you an introduction to the basics of Matlab. During the two day course we will use a practical based approach to give you the confidence to start using Matlab in your own work. In particular we will show you how to write your own scripts and functions and how to use pre-written functions. We will also explore the many ways in which help is available to Matlab users. In addition we will cover basic computer programming in Matlab to enable you to write more efficient scripts.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

The goal of metabolomics is to identify and quantify the complete biochemical composition of a biological sample. With the increase in genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic information there is a growing need to understand the metabolic phenotype that these genes and proteins ultimately control.

The aim of this course is to provide an overview of metabolomics and its applications in life sciences, clinical and environmental settings. Over 2 days we will introduce different techniques used to extract metabolites and analyse samples to collect metabolomic data (such as HPLC or GC-based MS and NMR), present how to analyse such data, how to identify metabolites using online databases and how to map the metabolomic data to metabolic pathways.

The course content will predominantly be based on analysing samples from model plant species such as Arabidopsis thaliana but the procedures are transferable to all other organisms, including clinical and environmental settings.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

The aim of this course is to introduce participants to the basics of statistical analysis and the open source statistical software R, a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics.

Participants will actively use R throughout the course, during which they will be introduced to principles of statistical thinking and interpretation by example, exercises and discussion about a range of problems. The examples will be used to present a variety of statistical concepts and techniques, with no focus on any specific discipline.

Important information: We have 12 configured laptops for use at the workshop. After these laptops have been allocated, participants will either need to share, or bring their own. These laptops will be allocated to the first individuals to express an interest in using them. When booking, please indicate under "Special requirements" if you wish to use one of the 12 laptops or bring your own. Participants bringing their own laptop will be given instructions on what software to install.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register interest by linking here.

This course is aimed at those new to programming and provides an introduction to programming using Perl.

During this course you will learn the basics of the Perl programming language, including how to store data in Perl’s standard data structures such as arrays and hashes, and how to process data using loops, functions, and many of Perl’s built in operators. You will learn how to write and run your own Perl scripts and how to pass options and files to them. The course also covers sorting, regular expressions, references and multi-dimensional data structures.

The course will be taught using the online Learning Perl materials created by Sofia Robb of the University of California Riverside.

The course website providing links to the course materials is here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

This course provides a practical introduction to the writing of Python programs for the complete novice. Participants are lead through the core aspects of Python illustrated by a series of example programs. Upon completion of the course, attentive participants will be able to write simple Python programs and customize more complex code to fit their needs.

Course materials are available here.

Please note that the content of this course has recently been updated. This course now mostly focuses on core concepts including Python syntax, data structures and reading/writing files. Concepts and strategies for working more effectively with Python are now the focus of a new 2-days course, Data Science in Python.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

An Introduction to Solving Biological Problems with R Tue 11 Jun 2019   09:30 Finished

Please note that this course has been discontinued and has been replaced by the Introduction to R for biologists.

R is a highly-regarded, free, software environment for statistical analysis, with many useful features that promote and facilitate reproducible research.

In this course, we give an introduction to the R environment and explain how it can be used to import, manipulate and analyse tabular data. After the course you should feel confident to start exploring your own dataset using the materials and references provided.

The course website providing links to the course materials is here.

Please note that although we will demonstrate how to perform statistical analysis in R, we will not cover the theory of statistical analysis in this course. Those seeking an in-depth explanation of how to perform and interpret statistical tests are advised to see the list of Related courses. Moreover, those with some programming experience in other languages (e.g. Python, Perl) might wish to attend the follow-on Data Analysis and Visualisation in R course.

This event is supported by the BBSRC Strategic Training Awards for Research Skills (STARS) grant (BB/P022766/1).

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

THIS EVENT IS NOW FULLY BOOKED!

This Autumn School aims to familiarise biomedical students and researchers with principles of Data Science. Focusing on utilising machine learning algorithms to handle biomedical data, it will cover: effects of experimental design, data readiness, pipeline implementations, machine learning in Python, and related statistics, as well as Gaussian Process models.

Providing practical experience in the implementation of machine learning methods relevant to biomedical applications, including Gaussian processes, we will illustrate best practices that should be adopted in order to enable reproducibility in any data science application.

This event is sponsored by Cambridge Big Data.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Bacterial Genome Assembly and Annotation in Galaxy new Thu 8 Jun 2017   09:30 Finished

The workshop will cover the basics of de novo genome assembly using a small genome example. This includes project planning steps, selecting fragment sizes, initial assembly of reads into fully covered contigs, and then assembling those contigs into larger scaffolds that may include gaps. The end result will be a set of contigs and scaffolds with sufficient average length to perform further analysis on, including genome annotation (link to that nomination). This workshop will use tools and methods targeted at small genomes. The basics of assembly and scaffolding presented here will be useful for building larger genomes, but the specific tools and much of the project planning will be different.

This workshop will also introduce genome annotation in the context of small genomes. We’ll begin with genome annotation concepts, and then introduce resources and tools for automatically annotating small genomes. The workshop will finish with a review of options for further automatic and manual tuning of the annotation, and for maintaining it as new assemblies or information becomes available.

This session will include an introduction to the Galaxy platform.

This event is co-organized with EMBL-ABR and the Genomics Virtual Lab. Course materials can be found here.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Basic statistics and data handling Wed 28 Feb 2018   09:30 Finished

This three day course is intended to open doors to applying statistics - whether directly increasing skills and personally undertaking analyses, or by expanding knowledge towards identifying collaborators. The end goal is to drive confident engagement with data analysis and further training - increasing the quality and reliability of interpretation, and putting that interpretation and subsequent presentation into the hands of the researcher. Each day of the course will deliver a mixture of lectures, workshops and hands-on practicals – and will focus on the following specific elements.

Day 1 focuses on basic approaches and the computer skills required to do downstream analysis. Covering: Basic skills for data manipulation in R. How to prepare your data effectively. Principles of experimental design and how this influences analysis.

On day 2, participants will explore the core concepts of statistics – so that they can begin to see how they can be applied to their own work, and to also help with better critical evaluation of the work of others. Covering: Basic statistics concepts and practice: power, variability, false discovery, t-test, effect size, simulations to understand what a p-value means.

On day 3 we will continue to explore core concepts of statistics, focusing on linear regression and multiple testing correction.

Course materials are available here.

This event is supported by the BBSRC Strategic Training Awards for Research Skills (STARS) grant (BB/P022766/1).

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Big Data and Cloud Computing new Fri 1 Jun 2018   09:30 Finished

Recent advances in genomics, proteomics, imaging and other technologies, have resulted in data being generated at a faster rate than they can be meaningfully analysed. In this course we will show you how cloud computing can be used to meet the challenges of storage, management and analysis of big data. The first half of the course will introduce cloud infrastructure technologies. The second half will cover tools for collaborative working, resource management, and creation of workflows. The instructors will demonstrate how they are using cloud computing in their own research.

N.B. If you sign up for this course, you will be automatically registered for an AWS educate account, which will provide you with sufficient AWS credits to complete the course exercises. If you decide to continue using cloud computing after the course, you will need to either purchase more credits or apply for a grant from programs like: AWS Cloud Credits for Research, Microsoft Azure for Research or Google Cloud Platform Education Grants.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

In this course we will introduce web-based, open source tools to analyse and interpret high-throughput biological data.

The main focus will be g:Profiler - a toolset for finding most significant functional groups for a given gene or protein list; MEM - a query engine allowing to mine hundreds of public gene expression datasets to find most co-expressed genes based on a query gene; and ClustVis - a web tool for visualizing clustering of multivariate data using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) plot and heatmap.

MEM and g:Profiler are ELIXIR-Estonia node services.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Bioinformatics for Principal Investigators Mon 16 Sep 2019   09:30 Finished

The aim of this workshop is to provide principal investigators with an introduction to the challenges of working with biological data and to the best practices, and tools, needed to perform bioinformatics research effectively and reproducibly.

On day 1, we will cover the importance of experimental design, discuss the challenges associated with (i) the analysis of high-throughput sequencing data (utilising RNA-seq as a working example) and (ii) the application of machine learning algorithms, as well as issues relating to reusability and reproducibility.

On day 2, we will put into practice concepts from day 1, running a RNA-seq data analysis pipeline, going from raw reads through differential expression analysis and the interpretation of downstream analysis results. Challenges encountered at each step of the analytical pipeline will be discussed. Please note that day 2 is optional.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

InterMine is a freely available data integration and analysis system that has been used to create a suite of databases for the analysis of large and complex biological data sets.

InterMine-based data analysis platforms are available for many organisms including mouse, rat, budding yeast, plants, nematodes, fly, zebrafish and more recently human. See here for a comprehensive list of InterMine databases.

The InterMine web interface offers sophisticated query and visualisation tools, as well as comprehensive web services for bioinformaticians. Genomic and proteomic data within InterMine databases includes pathways, gene expression, interactions, sequence variants, GWAS, regulatory data and protein expression.

This course will focus on the InterMine web interface and will introduce participants to all aspects of the user interface, starting with some simple exercises and building up to more complex analysis encompassing several analysis tools and comparative analysis across organisms. The exercises will mainly use the fly, human and mouse databases, but the course is applicable to anyone working with data for which an InterMine database is available.

This event is organised alongside a half day course on Biological data analysis using the InterMine API. More information on this event are available here.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Biological data analysis using the InterMine API new Wed 19 Jun 2019   13:30 Finished

InterMine is a freely available data integration and analysis system that has been used to create a suite of databases for the analysis of large and complex biological data sets.

InterMine-based data analysis platforms are available for many organisms including mouse, rat, budding yeast, plants, nematodes, fly, zebrafish and more recently human. See here for a comprehensive list of InterMine databases. Genomic and proteomic data within InterMine databases includes pathways, gene expression, interactions, sequence variants, GWAS, regulatory data and protein expression.

InterMine provides sophisticated query and visualisation tools both through a web interface and an extensive API; this course will focus on programmatic access to InterMine through its API and on running InterMine searches using Python, Perl and R scripts. The exercises will mainly use the fly, human and mouse databases, but the course is applicable to anyone working with data for which an InterMine database is available.

This event is organised alongside a half day course on Biological data analysis using the InterMine User Interface. More information on this event are available here.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

The Open Microscopy Environment (OME) is an open-source software project that develops tools that enable access, analysis, visualization, sharing and publication of biological image data.

OME has three components:

  • OME-TIFF, standardised file format and data model;
  • Bio-Formats, a software library for reading proprietary image file formats; and
  • OMERO, a software platform for image data management and analysis.

In this one day course, we will present the OMERO platform, and show how Facility Managers can use it to manage users, groups, and their microscopy, HCS and digital pathology data.

Help pages on 'Using OMERO for Facility Managers' can be found here.

This course is organized alongside a one day course on Biological Imaging Data Management for Life Scientists. More information on this event are available here.

This course will be delivered by members of the OMERO team. The OME project is supported by BBSRC and Wellcome Trust.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

The Open Microscopy Environment (OME) is an open-source software project that develops tools that enable access, analysis, visualization, sharing and publication of biological image data.

OME has three components:

  • OME-TIFF, standardised file format and data model;
  • Bio-Formats, a software library for reading proprietary image file formats; and
  • OMERO, a software platform for image data management and analysis.

In this one day course, we will present the OMERO platform, and show how to import, organise, view, search, annotate and publish imaging data. Additionally, we will briefly introduce how to use a variety of processing tools with OMERO.

This course is organized alongside a one day course on Biological Imaging Data Processing for Data Scientists. More information on this event are available here.

This course will be delivered by members of the OMERO team. The OME project is supported by BBSRC and Wellcome Trust.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

The Open Microscopy Environment (OME) is an open-source software project that develops tools that enable access, analysis, visualization, sharing and publication of biological image data.

OME has three components:

  • OME-TIFF, standardised file format and data model;
  • Bio-Formats, a software library for reading proprietary image file formats; and
  • OMERO, a software platform for image data management and analysis.

In this one day course, we will present the OMERO platform, and show how to transition from manual data processing to automated processing workflows. We will introduce how to write applications against the OMERO API, how to integrate a variety of processing tools with OMERO and how to automatically generate output ready for publication.

This course is organized alongside a one day course on Biological Imaging Data Management for Life Scientists. More information on this event are available here.

This course will be delivered by members of the OMERO team. The OME project is supported by BBSRC and Wellcome Trust.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

ChIP-seq and ATAC-seq analysis Wed 23 Oct 2019   09:30 Finished

The primary aim of this course is to familiarise participants with the analysis of ChIP-seq and ATAC-seq data and provide hands-on training on the latest analytical approaches.

The course starts with an introduction to ChIP-seq experiments for the detection of genome-wide DNA binding sites of transcription factors and other proteins. We first show data quality control and basic analytical steps such as alignment, peak calling and motif analysis, followed by practical examples on how to work with biological replicates and fundamental quality metrics for ChIP-seq datasets. On the second day, we then focus on the analysis of differential binding, comparing between different samples. We will also give an introduction to ATAC-seq data analysis for the detection of regions of open chromatin.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

COSMIC, the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer, is the world’s largest and most comprehensive expert manually curated resource for exploring the impact of somatic mutations in human cancer. Based at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and available publicly at https://cancer.sanger.ac.uk/cosmic, the latest release includes almost 6 million coding mutations across 1.4 million samples from over 26,000 papers. COSMIC captures the full spectrum of genomic data relating to somatic mutations, so in addition to coding mutations, gene fusions, non-coding mutations, copy-number variants, methylation and drug resistance mutations are included.

This course will use the live COSMIC website and tools to show you how to access and explore this information, seeking to identify genetic causes and targets in all human cancers.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

CRUK: Advanced Image Analysis with Fiji new Tue 10 Dec 2019   09:00 Finished

Fiji/ImageJ is a popular open-source image analysis software application. This course will build on top of the Fiji basic course, to continue explore advanced image processing: segmentation, tracking, and with a specific focus on scripting/programming using Fiji scripting environment. We will use python programming language, and aim to give a tutorial on both image processing and python programming.

This course is run by the CRUK CI Light microscopy core facility.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

CRUK: Analysis of publicly available microarray data Mon 20 Feb 2017   09:30 Finished

Although microarrays have been superseded by high-throughput sequencing technologies for gene expression profiling, years of experience gained from analysing microarray data has led to a variety of analysis techniques and datasets that can be exploited in other contexts. In this course, we will focus on retrieving and exploring microarray data from public repositories such as Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO).

Course materials can be found here.

This event is part of a series of training courses organized in collaboration with Dr. Mark Dunning at CRUK Cambridge Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

CRUK: Beginners guide to version control with git Wed 2 Nov 2016   13:30 Finished

Version control is the management of changes to documents, computer programs, and other collections of information. Changes are usually identified by a number named the "revision number". Each revision is associated with a timestamp and the person making the change. Revisions can be compared, restored, and with some types of files, merged.

Version control systems like subversion (svn) and git are frequently used for groups writing software and code, but can be used for any kind of files or projects. Many people share their git repositories on GitHub.

This course will provide an introduction to git and how you can use github to share your projects, or for your own private use if you wish.

Course materials can be found here.

This event is part of a series of training courses organized in collaboration with Dr. Mark Dunning at CRUK Cambridge Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

This course will provide participants with an introduction to EMBL-EBI and its data tools and resources, which cover the whole spectrum of biological / life sciences.

Sessions with trainers from ArrayExpress, Expression Atlas and the GWAS catalog will explore SNP-trait associations and show how further understanding can be gained on the location and level of gene expression across the body.

This event is part of a series of training courses organized in collaboration with Dr. Mark Dunning at CRUK Cambridge Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

CRUK: Experimental Design Mon 28 Oct 2019   10:00 Finished

Modern technologies are able to deliver an unprecedented amount of data rapidly. However, without due care and attention early in the experimental process, such data are meaningless if they cannot adequately answer the intended research question. This course is aimed at those planning high-throughput experiments and highlights the kinds of questions they should be asking themselves. The course consists of a lecture and small-group discussions led by a member of the Genomics or Bioinformatics Cores.

This event is part of a series of training courses organized in collaboration with the Bioinformatics Core Facility at CRUK Cambridge Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

CRUK: Image Analysis with Cellprofiler new Mon 2 Jul 2018   12:30 Finished

CellProfiler is a free, open-source image analysis software designed to enable biologists without training in computer vision or programming to quantitatively measure phenotypes from thousands of images automatically.

This course will introduce you the basic usage, and several application examples to help you understand and build up image processing and analysis workflows within CellProfiler. It will also cover a brief introduction to the usage of its companion package CellProfiler Analyst, which allows interactive exploration and analysis of image data. Some related theoretical topics in image processing will also be covered.

This course is run by the CRUK CI Light microscopy core facility.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

CRUK: Image Analysis with Fiji Fri 26 Jul 2019   12:30 Finished

Fiji/ImageJ is a popular open-source image analysis software application. This course will briefly cover introductory aspects of image processing and analysis theory, but will focus on practical sessions where participants will gain hands on experience with Fiji.

This course is run by the CRUK CI Light microscopy core facility.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

CRUK: Introduction to Command Line Linux Mon 11 Nov 2019   09:30 Finished

This short (0.5 day) intensive course serves to introduce you to the command-line interface in Linux.

It is based upon elements of the Software Carpentries Shell(novice) and Shell(extras) courses. It is recommended for those CI personnel planning on attending the CI High Performance Computing facilities (Cluster) course.

This course is run by the CRUK CI Bioinformatics and IT core.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

CRUK: Introduction to CRUK High Performance Computing Tue 26 Nov 2019   09:00 Finished

Using the Cambridge Institute's High Performance Computing Facilities, this brief (0.5 day) course will give you three things:

  • A refresher on Unix and an introduction to cluster computing, i.e. what High Performance Computing facilities re available to you at CI.
  • Basic instruction on using our scheduler (The scheduler allots slots of processing time to the jobs submitted by the multiplicity of users on the cluster).
  • Some performance hints for efficient use of the HPC

It won't make you an expert on parallel computing and H.P.C, but will let you get to work.

Note that a pre-requisite for this course is either existing familiarity with the Unix/Linux command-line or attendance of our Linux course CRUK: Introduction to Linux Command Line.

This course is run by the CRUK CI Bioinformatics and IT core.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Galaxy is an open, web-based platform for data-intensive life science research that enables non-bioinformaticians to create, run, tune, and share their own bioinformatic analyses.

A Galaxy introduction course covering basic functions, simple data manipulation using use cases and examples and visualisation mostly targeted at first time users.

Further information is available from the course website.

This event is part of a series of training courses organised in collaboration with Dr. Mark Dunning at CRUK Cambridge Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book by linking here.

CRUK: Introduction to Linear Modelling with R Tue 5 Mar 2019   09:45 Finished

The course will cover ANOVA, linear regression and some extensions. It will be a mixture of lectures and hands-on time using RStudio to analyse data.

This event is part of a series of training courses organized in collaboration with the Bioinformatics Core Facility at CRUK Cambridge Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

CRUK: Introduction to Statistical Analysis Tue 26 Nov 2019   09:30 Finished

This course provides a refresher on the foundations of statistical analysis. The emphasis is on interpreting the results of a statistical test, and being able to determine the correct test to apply.

Practicals are conducted using a series of online apps, and we will not teach a particular statistical analysis package, such as R. For courses that teach R, please see the links under "Related courses" .

This event is part of a series of training courses organized in collaboration with the Bioinformatics Core Facility at CRUK Cambridge Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

This course provides a refresher on the foundations of statistical analysis. Practicals are conducted using the R commander package, which provides an accessible interface to the R statistical language.

This event is part of a series of training courses organized in collaboration with Dr. Mark Dunning at CRUK Cambridge Institute.

Modern genomics technologies are able to produce large volumes of data that often leave researchers feeling overwhelmed and unsure of how to begin the process of biological interpretation.

In this course, we explain the common file formats generated by sequencing technologies and how they can be manipulated and explored by non-bioinformaticians. The tool that we will use is the Integrative Genomics Viewer (IGV).

If time allows, there will be time at the end of the session for you to explore your own datasets with the assistance of the instructors.

This event is part of a series of training courses organized in collaboration with Dr. Mark Dunning at CRUK Cambridge Institute. The materials for the course were developed in collaboration with Dr. Thomas Carroll from the MRC CSC.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book by linking here.

CRUK: Managing your Research Data Thu 28 Nov 2019   12:30 Finished

How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen? Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'? Have you ever struggled to import your spreadsheets into R? Would you be able to write a Data Management Plan as part of a grant proposal?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications. Whether you create, receive or collect data, you will certainly need to organise it at some stage of your project. This workshop will provide an overview of some basic principles on how we can work with data more effectively. We will discuss the best practices for research data management and organisation so that our research is auditable and reproducible by ourselves, and others, in the future.

Course materials are available here

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

This course has the following objectives:

  • To provide an overview on the importance of microscopy image analysis and tools in Arivis Vision4D software for the quantification of various biological problems: cell analysis, time-lapse, colocalization, stitching, handle large images etc
  • Practical session with computers during which participants will be introduced to image analysis and visualization using Vision4D
  • Demonstration on how virtual reality can help with image visualization and quantification

This course is run by the CRUK CI Light microscopy core facility.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

CRUK Summer School Mon 24 Jul 2017   09:30 Finished

CRUK Summer School

Event posted for Administration purposes only

CRUK: Using the Ensembl Genome Browser Mon 18 Apr 2016   09:30 Finished

The Ensembl Project provides a comprehensive and integrated source of annotation of, mainly vertebrate, genome sequences. This one-day workshop offers a comprehensive practical introduction to the use of the Ensembl genome browser as well as essential background information.

This course will focus on the vertebrate genomes in Ensembl, however much of what will be covered is also applicable to the non-vertebrates (plants, bacteria, fungi, metazoa and protists) in Ensembl Genomes.

There may be some tools and topics that do not apply to non-vertebrates; if you have any questions about this, please email the Ensembl Outreach Project Leader, Emily Perry.

This event is part of a series of training courses organized in collaboration with Dr. Mark Dunning at CRUK Cambridge Institute.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

Data Carpentry in R Mon 1 Apr 2019   09:30 Finished

In many domains of research the rapid generation of large amounts of data is fundamentally changing how research is done. The deluge of data presents great opportunities, but also many challenges in managing, analysing and sharing data.

Data Carpentry workshops are designed to teach basic concepts, skills and tools for working more effectively with data, using a combination of tools with a main focus in R. The workshop is aimed at researchers in the life sciences at all career stages and is designed for learners with little to no prior knowledge of programming, shell scripting, or command line tools.

Course materials are available here.

This course is organised in collaboration with ElixirUK and the Software Sustainability Institute.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Data Manipulation and Visualisation in R Mon 10 Jun 2019   09:30 Finished

Please note that this course has been discontinued and has been replaced by the Introduction to R for biologists.

This course introduces some relatively new additions to the R programming language: dplyr and ggplot2. In combination these R packages provide a powerful toolkit to make the process of manipulating and visualising data easy and intuitive.

Materials for this course can be found here.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Data Science in Python Tue 11 Feb 2020   09:30 [Full]

This course covers concepts and strategies for working more effectively with Python with the aim of writing reusable code, using function and libraries. Participants will acquire a working knowledge of key concepts which are prerequisites for advanced programming in Python e.g. writing modules and classes.

Note: this course is the continuation of the Introduction to Solving Biological Problems with Python; participants are expected to have attended the introductory Python course and/or have acquired some working knowledge of Python. This course is also open to Python beginners who are already fluent in other programming languages as this will help them to quickly get started in Python.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

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