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Department of Chemistry

Department of Chemistry course timetable

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Tue 24 Sep – Thu 17 Oct

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[ No events on Tue 24 Sep ]

Tuesday 1 October

13:00
Chemistry: FS8 Supervising Undergraduates Finished 13:00 - 14:00 Wolfson Lecture Theatre

In this short talk we will cover what supervisions are, the role they play in Cambridge teaching, and how supervisors are recruited. We will then go on to look at how you can prepare for supervising, how you can conduct a supervision, and how to deal with common pitfalls.

14:15
Chemistry: IS1 Library Orientation Finished 14:15 - 14:45 Library

This is a compulsory session which introduces new graduate students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

You must choose one session out of the 9 sessions available.

Wednesday 2 October

10:15
Chemistry: IS1 Library Orientation Finished 10:15 - 10:45 Library

This is a compulsory session which introduces new graduate students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

You must choose one session out of the 9 sessions available.

14:15
Chemistry: IS1 Library Orientation Finished 14:15 - 14:45 Library

This is a compulsory session which introduces new graduate students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

You must choose one session out of the 9 sessions available.

Thursday 3 October

10:15
Chemistry: IS1 Library Orientation Finished 10:15 - 10:45 Library

This is a compulsory session which introduces new graduate students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

You must choose one session out of the 9 sessions available.

14:15
Chemistry: IS1 Library Orientation Finished 14:15 - 14:45 Library

This is a compulsory session which introduces new graduate students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

You must choose one session out of the 9 sessions available.

Friday 4 October

10:00

The session will cover the use of electronic laboratory notebook which is a computer programme designed to replace laboratory notebooks. ELN will help the users to document research, experiments and procedures performed in a laboratory.

12:00

This course will focus on recent progress in the application of kernel-based methods, Random Forests and Deep Neural Networks to modelling in chemistry. The material will build on the content of the core Informatics course and introduce new descriptors, advanced modelling techniques and example applications drawn from the current literature. Lectures will be interactive, with students working through computational exercises during class sessions.

14:15
Chemistry: IS1 Library Orientation Finished 14:15 - 14:45 Library

This is a compulsory session which introduces new graduate students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

You must choose one session out of the 9 sessions available.

15:15
Chemistry: IS1 Library Orientation Finished 15:15 - 15:45 Library

This is a compulsory session which introduces new graduate students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

You must choose one session out of the 9 sessions available.

Monday 7 October

11:00
Chemistry: SF1 Departmental Safety Induction Finished 11:00 - 12:30 Wolfson Lecture Theatre

The Departmental Advanced Safety Training covers basic induction training in how to work safely, including emergency arrangements for fire and evacuation, first aid and incidents including flood and gas leak. By attending, you are made aware of the Department’s Health and Safety Policy and your responsibilities under health and safety law. You will be introduced to the process required to prepare a risk assessment with standard operating procedure (SOP) or method statement, how to select the correct type of protective equipment (PPE) and why it needs to be worn, and reminded of the importance of good house keeping for reducing the likelihood of there being an incident. The hazards associated with display screen equipment (DSE) and manual handling are identified and the need to control them by a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risk is explained. Electrical safety and the requirement for annual Portable Appliance Testing (PAT) is made clear.

13:30
Chemistry: SF2 University Chemical Safety Training Finished 13:30 - 17:00 Wolfson Lecture Theatre

Part of Induction Week

Tuesday 8 October

09:00
Chemistry: SF4 Pressurised Gas & Cryogens Finished 09:00 - 12:30 Wolfson Lecture Theatre

This course will cover safe storage and use of cryogens, safe use and stores of compressed gas, and aspects of oxygen depletion with respect to the above.

13:30
Chemistry: SF3 Advanced Safety Training for Experimentalists Finished 13:30 - 15:00 Wolfson Lecture Theatre

Advanced induction training for experimentalists introduces some of the department’s special chemical hazards including explosives, hydrogen fluoride and cyanide, and restricted chemicals, and illustrates the consequences of incorrect waste disposal. Experimentalists are made aware of the biological hazards in the department and how these are controlled with a suitable risk assessment, safety cabinets and the need for the appropriate inactivation method to be applied. Attendees are alerted to the hazards and damage caused by non-ionising radiation, glassware and sharps, oil baths and lifting equipment. The induction concludes by directing the experimentalist to compulsory University-provided specialist training courses, the requirement for fire awareness training and sources of Health and Safety information.

Wednesday 9 October

11:00
Chemistry: SF5 Introduction to Demonstrating Finished 11:00 - 12:30 Part 1A Lab

We view demonstrating to undergraduate students as a key part of postgraduate education.

Demonstrating is compulsory for 1st and 2d year postgraduate students with the right background (we do not wish to place anybody in the undergraduate laboratories for whom this would be inappropriate).

Demonstrating is also open to all MPhil, 3rd/4th year graduate students and postdoctoral researchers.

14:00
Chemistry: IS1 Library Orientation Finished 14:00 - 14:30 Library

This is a compulsory session which introduces new graduate students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

You must choose one session out of the 9 sessions available.

Thursday 10 October

10:00
Chemistry: FS29 Fortran 90/95 for Physical Scientists new (1 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 11:00 G30

You will be introduced to Fortran 90/95 and provided with materials which cover the basics of Fortran 90/95 with an emphasis on applications in the physical sciences. The key concepts of loops, functions, subroutines, modules, and other standard Fortran syntax will be introduced sequentially.

Monday 14 October

12:00
Chemistry: Philosophy for Chemists (1 of 3) Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Unilever Lecture Theatre

Science is a striking, successful and powerful feature of contemporary human cultures: it has transformed lives, enabled great technological feats and often revealed the world to be a much stranger place than appearances suggest. But what is science, really, and how and why has it been so successful? This 3 week course aims to introduce graduate students to some main themes in the philosophy of science generally, and the philosophy of chemistry in particular.

Lecture 1. What Is Science?

What makes science scientific? Is there something distinctive about scientific investigation which distinguishes it from other things humans do? Does science give us infallible knowledge? Or at least the kind of knowledge that always gets better? These questions will be discussed in relation to the views of some well-known philosophers of science including Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn.

Lecture 2. Measurement

Measurement is the foundation of any quantitative empirical science. We make all sorts of measurements routinely in the lab, but there are actually deep difficulties in knowing if our instruments and procedures correctly measure what we intend to measure. The epistemological issues involved here will be discussed through various scientific examples, including temperature and pH.

Lecture 3. Reductionism

Does all science ultimately boil down to fundamental physics? This is a pertinent issue to all areas of science, but an urgent one especially for chemistry. Considering the success of quantum chemistry one might imagine that chemistry is just applied physics, but the matter is not so simple. Looking at the longer history of the attempts to reduce chemistry to physics will also be instructive.

Tuesday 15 October

13:30

This session introduces new undergraduate Chemistry students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

Wednesday 16 October

10:00

This session is compulsory for all experimentalists to attend and will provide useful information regarding analytical facilities at this Department including NMR, mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. Short descriptions will be given of all available instruments, as well as explain the procedures for preparing/submitting samples for the analysis will also be discussed.

13:30

This session introduces new undergraduate Chemistry students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

14:00

The course will introduce the general methodology of model development, including techniques for model identification and parameter estimation. The idea of model-based design of experiments will be introduced and linked to parameter estimation. Tools for model development and MBDoE will also be introduced.

Thursday 17 October

10:00
Chemistry: FS29 Fortran 90/95 for Physical Scientists new (2 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 11:00 G30

You will be introduced to Fortran 90/95 and provided with materials which cover the basics of Fortran 90/95 with an emphasis on applications in the physical sciences. The key concepts of loops, functions, subroutines, modules, and other standard Fortran syntax will be introduced sequentially.

13:30

This session introduces new undergraduate Chemistry students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

14:00

The course will introduce the general methodology of model development, including techniques for model identification and parameter estimation. The idea of model-based design of experiments will be introduced and linked to parameter estimation. Tools for model development and MBDoE will also be introduced.