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Showing courses 26-43 of 43
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Submission of the PhD thesis can seem to be a daunting experience, from constructing it to submitting and then being examined, with one of those examiners coming from an external institution. In this session, Marie Dixon (Degree Committee Office, School of Physical Sciences), Rachel MacDonald and Deborah Longbottom will talk through all aspects of procedure regarding thesis submission and answer any questions students wish to pose. Students who were recently examined, as well as members of academic staff who carry out PhD vivas will also be there to talk about the reality of the process from all perspectives

Submission of an MPhil thesis can seem to be a daunting experience, from constructing it to submitting and then being examined, with one of those examiners coming from an external institution. In this session, Marie Dixon (Degree Committee Office, School of Physical Sciences), Rachel MacDonald and Deborah Longbottom will talk through all aspects of procedure regarding thesis submission and answer any questions students wish to pose. Students who were recently examined, as well as members of academic staff who carry out MPhil vivas will also be there to talk about the reality of the process from all perspectives.

FS1 - Successful Completion of a Research Degree An hour devoted to a discussion of how to plan your time effectively on a day to day basis, how to produce a dissertation/thesis (from first year report to MPhil to PhD) and the essential requirements of an experimental section.

FS2 - Dignity@Study The University of Cambridge is committed to protecting the dignity of staff, students, visitors to the University, and all members of the University community in their work and their interactions with others. The University expects all members of the University community to treat each other with respect, courtesy and consideration at all times. All members of the University community have the right to expect professional behaviour from others, and a corresponding responsibility to behave professionally towards others. Nick will explore what this means for graduate students in this Department with an opportunity to ask questions more informally.

This is a compulsory session for 1st year postgraduates.

1 other event...

Date Availability
Mon 18 May 2020 12:00 [Places]
Chemistry: FS20 Graduate Student Leadership Course Thu 7 May 2020   09:30 [Places]

A one day course that explores the considerable research that has been done into leadership and the ways to develop individual leadership skills. The challenges of leadership will be discussed and participants will gain an appreciation of effective leadership behaviour, as well as being given the opportunity to discuss and develop their own approaches to being a leader.

The Course Leader is Roger Sutherland, previously an HR Director for Mars Incorporated, and highly experienced in running courses for senior universities and companies

A thorough awareness of issues relating to research ethics and research integrity are essential to producing excellent research. This session will provide an introduction to the ethical responsibilities of researchers at the University, publication ethics and research integrity. It will be interactive, using case studies to better understand key ethical issues and challenges in all areas. There are three sessions running, you need attend only one.

2 other events...

Date Availability
Wed 18 Mar 2020 10:00 [Places]
Fri 15 May 2020 10:00 [Places]
Chemistry: FS4 Unconscious Bias Tue 24 Mar 2020   13:00 [Places]

Unconscious Bias refers to the biases we hold that are not in our conscious control. Research shows that these biases can adversely affect key decisions in the workplace. The session will enable you to work towards reducing the effects of unconscious bias for yourself and within your organisation. Using examples that you will be able to relate to, we help you to explore the link between implicit bias and the impact on the organisation. The overall aim of the session is to provide participants with an understanding of the nature of Unconscious Bias and how it impacts on individual and group attitudes, behaviours and decision-making processes.

The combination of modern computing power and density functional theory (DFT) has made it possible to explore the mechanisms and catalytic cycles of complex organic and organometallic reactions. These lectures will provide a practical introduction to performing DFT calculations to elucidate reaction mechanisms. Other applications of DFT calculations will be discussed such as computing spectra and structure identification.

These lectures will be accompanied by a workshop that will show the user how to perform DFT calculations and how to use the data generated by these calculations to draw conclusions about reaction mechanisms. No prior computational experience is required.

These are the accompanying workshops that will show the user how to perform DFT calculations and how to use the data generated by these calculations to draw conclusions about reaction mechanisms. No prior computational experience is required.

Chemistry: Green Chemistry new Tue 3 Dec 2019   09:00 [Places]

This course will provide an overview of Sustainable Chemistry in the Pharmaceutical Industry: Motivation and Legislation It will cover the following in more detail;

  • Solvents - tools for analysing the merits and drawbacks of different solvents and tools for selecting the optimum solvent for chromatography, common reactions, work-ups and other purposes
  • Reagents - tools for analysing the merits and drwabacks of different reagents and substrate scope for some greener reagents for common transformations
  • Metrics: Yield, Atom Economy, Reaction Mass Efficiency, E-factor, Process Mass Intensity, Life Cycle Analysis and Carbon Footprinting

Research reproducibility can be hard to get right. The aim of this talk is to raise awareness on the common pitfalls so you can confidently share your work for posterity. We will cover the dos and don’ts of data processing, how to comment on a script, and how to share it. Python will be used as an example because a variety of tools exist for this language. The goal is for anyone reading your paper to be able to go from the raw data to your paper figures.

The talk will last 20 minutes and there will be time for questions/discussion afterwards.

This talk is brought to you by the Chemistry Data Champions https://www-library.ch.cam.ac.uk/chemistry-data-champions

Chemistry: IS1 Library Orientation Fri 31 Jan 2020   10:15   [More dates...] [Places]

This is a compulsory session which introduces new graduate students to the Department of Chemistry Library and its place within the wider Cambridge University Library system. It provides general information on what is available, where it is, and how to get it. Print and online resources are included.

You must choose one session out of the 9 sessions available.

1 other event...

Date Availability
Mon 4 May 2020 10:15 [Places]
Chemistry: IS2 Citation Database Search Skills Fri 6 Mar 2020   10:00 [Places]

A ‘recommended’ optional course for Chemistry graduates that introduces all the relevant online databases available to you in the university: citation databases such as Web of Science, Scopus, and PubMed, which index all the scientific literature that is published, as well as chemistry and related subject-specific databases. You will be guided on how to search citation databases effectively and the session includes a hands-on element where you can practice - please bring your own laptop.

The session will be most suitable for those who are new to searching citation databases or would like a refresher.

Please note that this session will not cover searching the databases Reaxys and SciFinder. These are covered by IS5.

  • Please bring your own laptop so you can participate in the practical element of the session
Chemistry: IS3 Research Information Skills Wed 27 Nov 2019   10:00   [More dates...] [Places]

This compulsory course will equip you with the skills required to manage the research information you will need to gather throughout your graduate course, as well as the publications you will produce yourself. It will also help you enhance your online research profile and measure the impact of research.

2 other events...

Date Availability
Mon 16 Mar 2020 10:00 [Places]
Tue 19 May 2020 10:00 [Places]
Chemistry: IS4 Research Data Management Tue 14 Jan 2020   10:00   [More dates...] [Places]

This compulsory session introduces Research Data Management (RDM) to Chemistry PhD students. It is highly interactive and utilises practical activities throughout.

Key topics covered are:

  • Research Data Management (RDM) - what it is and what problems can occur with managing and sharing your data.
  • Data backup and file sharing - possible consequences of not backing up your data, strategies for backing up your data and sharing your data safely.
  • Data organisation - how to organise your files and folders, what is best practice.
  • Data sharing - obstacles to sharing your data, benefits and importance of sharing your data, the funder policy landscape, resources available in the University to help you share your data.
  • Data management planning - creating a roadmap for how not to get lost in your data!

Lunch and refreshments are included for this course

4 other events...

Date Availability
Thu 28 Nov 2019 11:00 [Standby]
Thu 6 Feb 2020 10:00 [Places]
Fri 20 Mar 2020 10:00 [Places]
Thu 21 May 2020 10:00 [Places]
Chemistry: IS5 SciFinder and Reaxys Mon 2 Mar 2020   11:30 [Places]

A ‘highly recommended’ optional course introducing electronic databases SciFinder and Reaxys presented by Professor Jonathan Goodman comprising of presentation followed by hands-on investigation.

SciFinder https://www.cas.org/products/scifinder provides access to biochemical, chemical, chemical engineering, medical and other related information in journal and patent literature. Bibliographic, substance and reaction information is available. SciFinder includes references from more than 10,000 scientific journals and patent information from 63 patent issuing authorities. Sources include journals, patents, conference proceedings, dissertations, technical reports and books. It is one of the world’s largest collections of organic and inorganic substance information.

It is possible to search by topic, author, company name, chemical structure, substructure, structure similarity and reaction. Personal registration is required for access to SciFinder on- and off-campus, please follow the instructions at: https://www-library.ch.cam.ac.uk/scifinder

Reaxys combines the content of CrossFire Beilstein, Gmelin and the Patent Chemistry Database in one search. Validated reaction and substance data are integrated with synthesis planning. Data from all three sources are merged into one substance record. Unlimited access on-campus via the web: https://www.reaxys.com/. Off-campus access via Raven password. (Personal registration is not required for access).

Please see the prerequisites. Please bring your own laptop for the practical element of the session.

Chemistry: Machine Learning in Chemistry 101 new Tue 14 Jan 2020   13:00 [Places]

This graduate-level course gives an overview of machine learning (ML) techniques that are useful for solving problems in Chemistry, and particularly for the computational understanding and predictions of materials and molecules at the atomic level.

In the first part of the course, after taking a quick refresher of the basic concepts in probabilities and statistics, students will learn about basic and advanced ML methods including supervised learning and unsupervised learning.

During the second part, the connection between chemistry and mathematical tools of ML will be made and the concepts on the construction of loss functions, representations, descriptors and kernels will be introduced.

For the last part, experts who are actively using research methods to solve research problems in chemistry and materials will be invited to give real-world examples on how ML methods have transformed the way they perform research.

Chemistry: Quantum Computing new Mon 10 Feb 2020   14:00 [Places]

Lecture 1 - Fundamentals of Quantum Computing A short summary of all the basic quantum computing knowledge needed to do quantum chemistry on a quantum computer.

Lecture 2 - Encoding chemistry systems in quantum computers

  • Second quantization
  • Jordan-Wigner and Bravyi-Kitaev transforms
  • Molecular orbital encoding
  • State Preparation

Lecture 3 - Quantum algorithms for energy calculations

  • NISQ: Variational quantum algorithms
  • Future: Phase Estimation algorithms

Lecture 4 - Advanced quantum chemistry quantum computing algorithms

  • Excited Algorithms: QSE, Constrained Minimisation, etc
  • Special Ansatz using symmetry
  • Imaginary time evolution
  • TBA
Chemistry: SC1-10 Statistics for Chemists Mon 13 Jan 2020   13:00 [Places]

This course is made up of 8 sessions which will be based around the topics below: unlike other courses in the Graduate Lecture Series, it is essential to attend all 8 sessions to benefit from this training. Places are limited so please be absolutely certain upon booking that you will commit to the entire course.

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