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Social Sciences Research Methods Programme course timetable

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Wed 6 Mar 2019 – Tue 22 Oct 2019

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Wednesday 6 March 2019

09:30
Multilevel Modelling (1 of 2) Finished 09:30 - 13:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

In this module, students will be introduced to multilevel modelling, also known as hierarchical linear modelling. MLM allows the user to analyse how outcomes are influenced by factors acting at multiple levels. So, for example, we might conceptualise children's educational process as being influenced by individual or family-level factors, as well as by factors operating at the level of the school or the neighbourhood. Similarly, outcomes for prisoners might be influenced by individual and/or family-level characteristics, as well as by the characteristics of the prison in which they are detained.

  • Introduction to Stata/MLM theory
  • Applications I - Random intercept models
  • Applications II - Random slope models
  • Applications III - Revision session/growth models
14:00
Multilevel Modelling (2 of 2) Finished 14:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

In this module, students will be introduced to multilevel modelling, also known as hierarchical linear modelling. MLM allows the user to analyse how outcomes are influenced by factors acting at multiple levels. So, for example, we might conceptualise children's educational process as being influenced by individual or family-level factors, as well as by factors operating at the level of the school or the neighbourhood. Similarly, outcomes for prisoners might be influenced by individual and/or family-level characteristics, as well as by the characteristics of the prison in which they are detained.

  • Introduction to Stata/MLM theory
  • Applications I - Random intercept models
  • Applications II - Random slope models
  • Applications III - Revision session/growth models

Monday 11 March 2019

10:00
Evaluation Methods (1 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 12:45 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

This course aims to provide students with a range of specific technical skills that will enable them to undertake impact evaluation of policy. Too often policy is implemented but not fully evaluated. Without evaluation we cannot then tell what the short or longer term impact of a particular policy has been. On this course, students will learn the skills needed to evaluate particular policies and will have the opportunity to do some hands on data manipulation. A particular feature of this course is that it provides these skills in a real world context of policy evaluation. It also focuses primarily not on experimental evaluation (Random Control Trials) but rather quasi-experimental methodologies that can be used where an experiment is not desirable or feasible.

Topics:

  • Regression-based techniques
  • Evaluation framework and concepts
  • The limitations of regression based approaches and RCTs
  • Before/After, Difference in Difference (DID) methods
  • Computer exercise on difference in difference methods
  • Instrumental variables techniques
  • Regression discontinuity design.
13:45
Evaluation Methods (2 of 4) Finished 13:45 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course aims to provide students with a range of specific technical skills that will enable them to undertake impact evaluation of policy. Too often policy is implemented but not fully evaluated. Without evaluation we cannot then tell what the short or longer term impact of a particular policy has been. On this course, students will learn the skills needed to evaluate particular policies and will have the opportunity to do some hands on data manipulation. A particular feature of this course is that it provides these skills in a real world context of policy evaluation. It also focuses primarily not on experimental evaluation (Random Control Trials) but rather quasi-experimental methodologies that can be used where an experiment is not desirable or feasible.

Topics:

  • Regression-based techniques
  • Evaluation framework and concepts
  • The limitations of regression based approaches and RCTs
  • Before/After, Difference in Difference (DID) methods
  • Computer exercise on difference in difference methods
  • Instrumental variables techniques
  • Regression discontinuity design.
14:00
Conversation and Discourse Analysis (4 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 15:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 9

The module will introduce students to the study of language use as a distinctive type of social practice. Attention will be focused primarily on the methodological and analytic principles of conversation analysis. (CA). However, it will explore the debates between CA and Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA), as a means of addressing the relationship between the study of language use and the study of other aspects of social life. It will also consider the roots of conversation analysis in the research initiatives of ethnomethodology, and the analysis of ordinary and institutional talk. It will finally consider the interface between CA and CDA.

Topics:

  • Session 1: The Roots of Conversation Analysis
  • Session 2: Ordinary Talk
  • Session 3: Institutional Talk
  • Session 4: Conversation Analysis and Critical Discourse Analysis
Public Policy Analysis (3 of 3) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 3

The analysis of policy depends on many disciplines and techniques and so is difficult for many researchers to access. This module provides a mixed perspective on policy analysis, taking both an academic and a practitioner perspective. This is because the same tools and techniques can be used in academic research on policy options and change as those used in practice in a policy environment. This course is provided as three 2 hour sessions delivered as a mix of lectures and seminars. No direct analysis work will be done in the sessions themselves, but some sample data and questions will be provided for students who wish to take the material into practice.

Tuesday 12 March 2019

10:00
Evaluation Methods (3 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 12:45 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This course aims to provide students with a range of specific technical skills that will enable them to undertake impact evaluation of policy. Too often policy is implemented but not fully evaluated. Without evaluation we cannot then tell what the short or longer term impact of a particular policy has been. On this course, students will learn the skills needed to evaluate particular policies and will have the opportunity to do some hands on data manipulation. A particular feature of this course is that it provides these skills in a real world context of policy evaluation. It also focuses primarily not on experimental evaluation (Random Control Trials) but rather quasi-experimental methodologies that can be used where an experiment is not desirable or feasible.

Topics:

  • Regression-based techniques
  • Evaluation framework and concepts
  • The limitations of regression based approaches and RCTs
  • Before/After, Difference in Difference (DID) methods
  • Computer exercise on difference in difference methods
  • Instrumental variables techniques
  • Regression discontinuity design.
13:30
Evaluation Methods (4 of 4) Finished 13:30 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course aims to provide students with a range of specific technical skills that will enable them to undertake impact evaluation of policy. Too often policy is implemented but not fully evaluated. Without evaluation we cannot then tell what the short or longer term impact of a particular policy has been. On this course, students will learn the skills needed to evaluate particular policies and will have the opportunity to do some hands on data manipulation. A particular feature of this course is that it provides these skills in a real world context of policy evaluation. It also focuses primarily not on experimental evaluation (Random Control Trials) but rather quasi-experimental methodologies that can be used where an experiment is not desirable or feasible.

Topics:

  • Regression-based techniques
  • Evaluation framework and concepts
  • The limitations of regression based approaches and RCTs
  • Before/After, Difference in Difference (DID) methods
  • Computer exercise on difference in difference methods
  • Instrumental variables techniques
  • Regression discontinuity design.

Wednesday 13 March 2019

09:30
Randomised Controlled Trials: (Almost) Everything You Need to Know (1 of 2) Finished 09:30 - 13:30 Institute of Criminology, Room B3

Standard statistical techniques in the social sciences are good at uncovering relationships between variables, but less good at establishing whether these relationships are causal. If A and B are correlated, does that mean A "causes" B? That B "causes" A? Or could both A and B be driven by a third factor C?

Randomised controlled trials are a type of study often considered to be the gold standard in uncovering this kind of causality. Many students and early-career researchers avoid RCTs, assuming they are complex and expensive to run. However, that need not be the case. This module will explain the theory of RCTs, how they are implemented, and will encourage participants to think about how they might design an RCT in their own field of work.

11:00
Factor Analysis (3 of 4) Finished 11:00 - 13:00 Plant Sciences, Large Lecture Theatre

This module introduces the statistical techniques of Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) is used to uncover the latent structure (dimensions) of a set of variables. It reduces the attribute space from a larger number of variables to a smaller number of factors. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) examines whether collected data correspond to a model of what the data are meant to measure. STATA will be introduced as a powerful tool to conduct confirmatory factor analysis. A brief introduction will be given to confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling.

  • Session 1: Exploratory Factor Analysis Introduction
  • Session 2: Factor Analysis Applications
  • Session 3: CFA and Path Analysis with STATA
  • Session 4: Introduction to SEM and programming
14:00
Randomised Controlled Trials: (Almost) Everything You Need to Know (2 of 2) Finished 14:00 - 18:00 Institute of Criminology, Room B3

Standard statistical techniques in the social sciences are good at uncovering relationships between variables, but less good at establishing whether these relationships are causal. If A and B are correlated, does that mean A "causes" B? That B "causes" A? Or could both A and B be driven by a third factor C?

Randomised controlled trials are a type of study often considered to be the gold standard in uncovering this kind of causality. Many students and early-career researchers avoid RCTs, assuming they are complex and expensive to run. However, that need not be the case. This module will explain the theory of RCTs, how they are implemented, and will encourage participants to think about how they might design an RCT in their own field of work.

Factor Analysis (4 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This module introduces the statistical techniques of Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) is used to uncover the latent structure (dimensions) of a set of variables. It reduces the attribute space from a larger number of variables to a smaller number of factors. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) examines whether collected data correspond to a model of what the data are meant to measure. STATA will be introduced as a powerful tool to conduct confirmatory factor analysis. A brief introduction will be given to confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling.

  • Session 1: Exploratory Factor Analysis Introduction
  • Session 2: Factor Analysis Applications
  • Session 3: CFA and Path Analysis with STATA
  • Session 4: Introduction to SEM and programming

Wednesday 9 October 2019

16:00
SSRMP Student Induction Lecture Finished 16:00 - 17:00 Lady Mitchell Hall

This event details how the SSRMP works, more about the modules we offer, and everything you need to know about making a booking.

NB. ALL STUDENTS WISHING TO TAKE SSRMP COURSES THIS YEAR ARE EXPECTED TO ATTEND THIS INDUCTION SESSION

Thursday 10 October 2019

10:00
Practical introduction to MATLAB Programming (1 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Kenneth Craik Room - Craik Marshall Building

This module is shared with Psychology. Students from the Department of Psychology MUST book places on this course via the Department; any bookings made by Psychology students via the SSRMP portal will be cancelled.

The course focuses on practical hands-on variable handling and programming implementation using rather than on theory. This course is intended for those who have never programmed before, including those who only call/run Matlab scripts but are not familiar with how code works and how matrices are handled in Matlab. (Note that calling a couple of scripts is not 'real' programming.)

MATLAB (C) is a powerful scientific programming environment optimal for data analysis and engineering solutions. More information on the programme and its uses can be found here

More information on the course can be found here

14:00
Practical introduction to MATLAB Programming (2 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 Kenneth Craik Room - Craik Marshall Building

This module is shared with Psychology. Students from the Department of Psychology MUST book places on this course via the Department; any bookings made by Psychology students via the SSRMP portal will be cancelled.

The course focuses on practical hands-on variable handling and programming implementation using rather than on theory. This course is intended for those who have never programmed before, including those who only call/run Matlab scripts but are not familiar with how code works and how matrices are handled in Matlab. (Note that calling a couple of scripts is not 'real' programming.)

MATLAB (C) is a powerful scientific programming environment optimal for data analysis and engineering solutions. More information on the programme and its uses can be found here

More information on the course can be found here

Friday 11 October 2019

10:00
Practical introduction to MATLAB Programming (3 of 4) Finished 10:00 - 12:00 Kenneth Craik Room - Craik Marshall Building

This module is shared with Psychology. Students from the Department of Psychology MUST book places on this course via the Department; any bookings made by Psychology students via the SSRMP portal will be cancelled.

The course focuses on practical hands-on variable handling and programming implementation using rather than on theory. This course is intended for those who have never programmed before, including those who only call/run Matlab scripts but are not familiar with how code works and how matrices are handled in Matlab. (Note that calling a couple of scripts is not 'real' programming.)

MATLAB (C) is a powerful scientific programming environment optimal for data analysis and engineering solutions. More information on the programme and its uses can be found here

More information on the course can be found here

14:00
Practical introduction to MATLAB Programming (4 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 Kenneth Craik Room - Craik Marshall Building

This module is shared with Psychology. Students from the Department of Psychology MUST book places on this course via the Department; any bookings made by Psychology students via the SSRMP portal will be cancelled.

The course focuses on practical hands-on variable handling and programming implementation using rather than on theory. This course is intended for those who have never programmed before, including those who only call/run Matlab scripts but are not familiar with how code works and how matrices are handled in Matlab. (Note that calling a couple of scripts is not 'real' programming.)

MATLAB (C) is a powerful scientific programming environment optimal for data analysis and engineering solutions. More information on the programme and its uses can be found here

More information on the course can be found here

Monday 14 October 2019

14:00
Introduction to Empirical Research Finished 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 1

This module is for anyone considering studying on an SSRMP module but not sure which one/s to choose. It provides an overview of the research process and issues in research design. Through reflection on a broad overview of empirical research, the module aims to encourage students to consider where they may wish to develop their research skills and knowledge. The module will signpost the different modules, both quantitative and qualitative, offered by SSRMP and encourage students to consider what modules might be appropriate for their research and career development.

You will learn:

  • The research process and the different stages it might consist of
  • Issues related to research design
  • To consider what data you will need to address your research aims
  • To consider the best methods to collect and analyse your data
  • What modules are offered by SSRMP and how they might be appropriate to your needs

Tuesday 15 October 2019

11:00
An Overview Of Qualitative Data Collection And Analysis new (1 of 4) Finished 11:00 - 13:00 Sidgwick Site, Lecture Block Room 1

With such a large variety of qualitative research methods to choose from, creating a research design can be confusing and difficult without a sufficiently informed overview. This module aims to provide an overview by introducing qualitative data collection and analysis methods commonly used in social science research. The module provides a foundation for other SSRMP qualitative methods modules such as ethnography, discourse analysis, interviews, or diary research. Knowing what is ‘out there’ will help a researcher purposefully select further modules to study on, provide readings to deepen knowledge on specific methods, and will facilitate a more informed research design that contributes to successful empirical research.

14:00
Psychometrics (1 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

An introduction to the design, validation and implementation of tests and questionnaires in social science research, using both Classical Test Theory (CTT) and modern psychometric methods such as Item Response Theory (IRT). This course aims to enable students to: be able to construct and validate a test or questionnaire; understand the strengths, weaknesses and limitations of existing tests and questionnaires; appreciate the impact and potential of modern psychometric methods in the internet age.

Week 1: Introduction to psychometrics
a. Psychometrics, ancient and modern. Classical Test Theory
b. How to design and build your own psychometric test

Week 2: Testing in the online environment
a. Testing via the internet. How to, plus do’s and don’ts
b. Putting your test online

Week 3: Modern Psychometrics
a. Item Response Theory (IRT) models and their assumptions
b. Advanced assessment using computer adaptive testing

Week 4: Implementing adaptive tests online
a. How to automatically generate ability items
b. Practical

16:00
Comparative Historical Methods (1 of 4) Finished 16:00 - 17:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 7

These four sessions will introduce students to comparative historical research methods, emphasizing their qualitative dimensions. In the first session, we will analyze some contemporary classics within this genre. In the second and third sessions, we will review and distinguish among a variety of intellectual justifications for this genre as a methodology. In the final session, we will focus on a "state of the art" defence of qualitative and comparative-historical research, both in theory and practice.

Wednesday 16 October 2019

16:00
Philosophical Foundations of Qualitative Methods: Introduction and Overview (1 of 2) Finished 16:00 - 17:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 4

This course will introduce students to the general philosophical debates concerning scientific methodology, assessing their ramifications for the conduct of qualitative social research. It will enable students to critically evaluate major programmes in the philosophy of sciences, considering whether there are important analytic differences between the social and natural sciences; and whether qualitative methods themselves comprise a unified approach to the study of social reality.

Monday 21 October 2019

15:00
Research Ethics Finished 15:00 - 18:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 6

Ethics is becoming an increasingly important issue for all researchers and the aim of this session is to demonstrate the practical value of thinking seriously and systematically about what constitutes ethical conduct in social science research. The session will involve a lecture component and some small-group work.

Aims:
To allow students to distinguish between values, moral and ethical issues, encourage students to think about problems and dilemmas in conducting research, help students to gain an overview of ethical relationships, enable students to know when to ask for help, and prepare students in terms of defence of possible criticisms of their own research.

Topics:

  • What do we mean by ethics?
  • National and international policy frameworks
  • Ethics and risk
  • Ethics across disciplinary boundaries
  • Dealing with ethical dilemmas
  • The processes of applying for ethics approval within the University of Cambridge

Tuesday 22 October 2019

11:00
An Overview Of Qualitative Data Collection And Analysis new (2 of 4) Finished 11:00 - 13:00 Sidgwick Site, Lecture Block Room 1

With such a large variety of qualitative research methods to choose from, creating a research design can be confusing and difficult without a sufficiently informed overview. This module aims to provide an overview by introducing qualitative data collection and analysis methods commonly used in social science research. The module provides a foundation for other SSRMP qualitative methods modules such as ethnography, discourse analysis, interviews, or diary research. Knowing what is ‘out there’ will help a researcher purposefully select further modules to study on, provide readings to deepen knowledge on specific methods, and will facilitate a more informed research design that contributes to successful empirical research.

14:00
Psychometrics (2 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

An introduction to the design, validation and implementation of tests and questionnaires in social science research, using both Classical Test Theory (CTT) and modern psychometric methods such as Item Response Theory (IRT). This course aims to enable students to: be able to construct and validate a test or questionnaire; understand the strengths, weaknesses and limitations of existing tests and questionnaires; appreciate the impact and potential of modern psychometric methods in the internet age.

Week 1: Introduction to psychometrics
a. Psychometrics, ancient and modern. Classical Test Theory
b. How to design and build your own psychometric test

Week 2: Testing in the online environment
a. Testing via the internet. How to, plus do’s and don’ts
b. Putting your test online

Week 3: Modern Psychometrics
a. Item Response Theory (IRT) models and their assumptions
b. Advanced assessment using computer adaptive testing

Week 4: Implementing adaptive tests online
a. How to automatically generate ability items
b. Practical

16:00
Comparative Historical Methods (2 of 4) Finished 16:00 - 17:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 7

These four sessions will introduce students to comparative historical research methods, emphasizing their qualitative dimensions. In the first session, we will analyze some contemporary classics within this genre. In the second and third sessions, we will review and distinguish among a variety of intellectual justifications for this genre as a methodology. In the final session, we will focus on a "state of the art" defence of qualitative and comparative-historical research, both in theory and practice.