skip to navigation skip to content

Office of Scholarly Communication course timetable

Show:

Fri 13 Jan – Fri 12 Jan 2018

Now Today



January 2017

Fri 13
Electronic Lab Notebooks: Solutions for Paperless Research new Finished 09:30 - 17:30 Department of Engineering, Lecture Room 6

Increasing numbers of electronic alternatives to the traditional paper lab book are available, offering advanced opportunities for managing your research.

  • Are you moving towards web-enabled working in the lab?
  • Have you considered the advantages of - and issues around - going paperless?

Hear from researchers and PIs across the disciplines who are using Electronic Lab Notebooks (ELNs) and those considering a trial, and from current providers.

We are grateful to Dotmatics for sponsoring this event.

Mon 16
Research software management, sharing and sustainability workshop Finished 10:30 - 17:00 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Glass Room
  • Do you manage and share software for research?
  • Are you encountering problems when managing research code?
  • Is current best practice working for you and your group - or not?
  • Would you like to discuss solutions for these problems with other researchers and research software experts?

Jisc, in collaboration with SSI, University of Cambridge, University of Sheffield, University of Bath, University of Leicester, University of Birmingham, the British Library and STFC are inviting all researchers interested and passionate about developing or using research software to join a workshop on this subject.

Fri 20
That Was The Year That Was: 2016 (For Librarians) Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Cambridge University Library, Milstein Room

We warmly invite you to join us to hear what the Office of Scholarly Communication has been up to over the past twelve months.

This is an opportunity to find out more about who we are, what Scholarly Communication is, and what we've been doing within the Cambridge libraries community and the wider University. Learn about some of the exciting projects that are underway, locally and as part of the international field of Scholarly Communication.

We hope you can join us for the whirlwind tour!

Wed 25

What is Open Research, and what does it mean for you?

  • Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions?
  • Would you like to boost citations of your work?
  • Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants?

These are questions for academics at all stages of their research.

Join us to explore:

  • everything you need to know about Open Access and data sharing in the humanities, arts and social sciences
  • how to use the University's Repository, Apollo, to publish your research and gain citations
  • the training and advisory services offered by the OSC to facilitate your research and career development
Mon 30
The Sherlock Librarian: Investigating Workplace Research new Finished 10:00 - 11:00 Cambridge University Library, Milstein Room

Library staff are often involved in problem solving as part of their daily roles, either on behalf of users or for themselves. Conducting research in the workplace is the next step but many find this a difficult one to take and often don't consider their work as research. Undertaking research in the workplace, both formal and informal, can help to generate solutions to problems, support a case of find out about your library but where do you start?

This one hour workshop introduces participants to the basics of undertaking workplace research including turning a problem into an actionable question, the skills needed and how to overcome common barriers. The workshop is suitable for complete novices, people wanting a quick refresher and those with just a passing interest.

February 2017

Wed 1

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much information would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research information?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Wed 8
Helping Researchers Publish in Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics new Finished 09:15 - 14:00 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Glass Room

Join us for the second in our series exploring resources to help with the process of publishing your research in STEM disciplines - from recording observations to editing to peer review.

This session offers the chance to learn about available tools and options in publishing and reviewing, and ask questions of the experts.

We will explore:

  • returning scientific publishing to the scientists: innovative approaches to publishing and peer-reviewing single observations (Laurence Rajendran, ScienceMatters)
  • post publication peer review, open peer review and preprints (Nikolaus Kriegeskorte)
  • using collaborative writing tools for your papers (Overleaf)
  • peer review FAQs (Jennifer Wright, CUP)
  • connecting active research management and research publishing (Nigel Goddard, Research Space)
  • peer review and the benefits of openness (Tom Culley, Publons)

Morning refreshments and lunch will be provided, during which time you can speak to providers for information and user support.

Thanks to Overleaf, Publons and Research Space for their sponsorship of this event.

If you cannot attend in person, join us live at http://cam.adobeconnect.com/osc2/ - simply select to 'enter as guest' (no need to create an Adobe Connect account).

Presentations: From Design to Delivery (For Librarians) Finished 14:30 - 16:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 10

Presentation skills are a vital part of working in the information profession yet this is an area many people feel uncomfortable with. They assume that presenting means standing up to deliver a talk to an audience but it can also involve leading a tour, speaking in meetings or working at an enquiry point.

This interactive workshop, tailored specifically to the library community, will take you through the process of creating and delivering a presentation, give you tips on design and public speaking and help you to feel more confident in communicating with others. At the end of the course you will be able to deliver any kind of session with confidence

Tue 14

What is Open Research, and what does it mean for you?

  • Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions?
  • Would you like to boost citations of your work?
  • Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants?

These are questions for academics at all stages of their research.

Join us to explore:

  • everything you need to know about Open Access and data sharing in STEM disciplines
  • how to use the University's Repository, Apollo, to publish your research and gain citations
  • the training and advisory services offered by the OSC to facilitate your research and career development
Wed 15

Confused by copyright? You are not alone!

Copyright involves much more than checking how much you are photocopying, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Join the Office of Scholarly Communication as we answer your copyright queries, looking at:

  • Copyright transfer agreements
  • Creative Commons
  • 3rd party copyright
  • Open Access publisher requirements

The session will start with a 40 minute presentation, after which the time is open for you to raise questions and discuss issues you have encountered.

Fri 17
The Sherlock Librarian: Investigating the Workplace new Finished 16:00 - 17:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 11

Library staff are often involved in problem solving as part of their daily roles, either on behalf of users or for themselves. Conducting research in the workplace is the next step but many find this a difficult one to take and often don't consider their work as research. Undertaking research in the workplace, both formal and informal, can help to generate solutions to problems, support a case of find out about your library but where do you start?

This one hour workshop introduces participants to the basics of undertaking workplace research including turning a problem into an actionable question, the skills needed and how to overcome common barriers. The workshop is suitable for complete novices, people wanting a quick refresher and those with just a passing interest.

Tue 21
  • Where should you publish your research?
  • What publishing format should you choose?

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess the appropriateness of a journal for your research - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • How you can use other people’s copyrighted material
Wed 22
  • Where should you publish your research?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a journal for your work?
  • How do you respond to reviewers?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess a journal - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • What happens during peer-review
Mon 27
Text and Data Mining Services: What can Cambridge Libraries Offer? A Round Table Discussion new Finished 10:00 - 11:30 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Glass Room

The Office of Scholarly Communication is participating in an RLUK Workshop on the topic of libraries and Text and Data Mining (T&DM) on 9 March this year.

We invite you to join the OSC and our colleagues from the University Library and Affiliated Libraries for a round table discussion on what we can expect libraries to do in the area of T&DM.

The key aims of the session are to share experiences about T&DM, and to discuss the questions and requirements we might have in terms of developing a support service.

We will explore:

  • some background on what T&DM is
  • the legal situation with T&DM
  • who is doing what - and how?
Research Data Management: Workshop (For GSLS PhD students) Finished 14:00 - 17:00 17 Mill Lane, Seminar Room G

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research data?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Tue 28

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics.

Explore:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research

March 2017

Wed 1
  • Where should you publish your monograph or book chapter?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a publisher for your work?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Turning your thesis into a monograph
  • Choosing a publisher
  • Understanding the publication process
Thu 2
Presentations: From Design to Delivery (For Librarians) CANCELLED 09:30 - 11:30 Cambridge University Library, Milstein Room

Presentation skills are a vital part of working in the information profession yet this is an area many people feel uncomfortable with. They assume that presenting means standing up to deliver a talk to an audience but it can also involve leading a tour, speaking in meetings or working at an enquiry point.

This interactive workshop, tailored specifically to the library community, will take you through the process of creating and delivering a presentation, give you tips on design and public speaking and help you to feel more confident in communicating with others. At the end of the course you will be able to deliver any kind of session with confidence

Tue 7
Research Data Management: Workshop (for PhD students in Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Finished 09:30 - 12:30 Clinical School, Addenbrookes, Bay 13, Room E

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research data?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Wed 8

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research
Wed 22
Hitting Your Target First Time: How to Choose the Right Publisher new Finished 15:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 10

So much choice, so little time!

With the growth in both traditional and online publishers choosing the best place to share their work is becoming an increasingly complex decision for researchers. The first in our Librarian Toolkit series on helping researchers publish will cover topics such as writing tools to use, picking the right format for publication, factors to consider when choosing a journal and how to use impact factors and other metrics.

Wed 29
Reflective Practice Workshop (For Librarians) new Finished 10:00 - 11:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

Being a reflective practitioner is something that doesn’t come naturally for many of us but it can be a surprisingly easy skill to develop. As well as helping you to think critically about yourself and your service, being able to reflect can help you to deal with feedback, prepare you for job interviews and become more confident.

This interactive workshop will help you to understand the theory of reflective practice and how to translate this into your everyday role. It will provide tips for overcoming barriers to carrying out reflection and how to deal with feedback as well as offering a brief introduction to reflective writing.

Thu 30
How to Get the Most Out of Modern Peer Review new Finished 10:00 - 17:30 Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities - S3

A scientist cannot do anything that is not checked and rechecked by scientists of this network before it is accepted. (Sune Bergström)*

The Office of Scholarly Communication invites you to a workshop to discover how you can make peer review count for your research.

Join Cambridge researchers, along with guest speakers from publishers eLife, F1000, CUP, PLOS and Nature Scientific Data, and peer review platform Publons, to demystify the peer review process and explore:

  • practical tips for the digital age peer-review
  • getting formal recognition for your peer review work
  • the role of peer-reviewer in checking supporting information, and tips and tricks for peer-reviewing research data
  • Open Evaluation - what is it and what does it achieve?
  • improving the quality of research through peer review
  • innovations in peer review - novel paths towards the same goal

Coffee and lunch will be provided

The day's programme is available here: http://bit.ly/2nvjQ7G

We are grateful to eLife, F1000, PLOS and Scientific Data for sponsoring this event.

(*from Sune Bergström's Banquet Speech accepting the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 10 Dec 1982)

April 2017

Tue 4
Perish Even if You Publish?: The Problem of ‘Predatory’ Publishers new Finished 11:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

'Dear esteemed author…'

So-called predatory publishers regularly approach researchers via email to solicit manuscripts and conference papers. With the emphasis on publishing as a measure of academic success still strong it can be easy to give in to temptation and flattery but this can do more harm than good to a future career.

As part of our Librarian Toolkit series on helping researchers publish this session will look at the problem of predatory publishers using case studies. Attendees will be given tips on how to spot a predatory publisher or conference and the best advice to offer if one of their researchers has been approached.

Mon 10
Increasing Openness and Reproducibility in Research new Finished 13:00 - 16:00 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Glass Room

Please join us for a workshop, hosted by the Office of Scholarly Communication in collaboration with the Center for Open Science, to learn easy, practical steps you can take to increase the reproducibility of your work.

The workshop will be hands-on. Using example studies, attendees will actively participate in creating a reproducible project from start to finish.

This workshop is aimed at graduate students and postdocs, across disciplines, who are engaged in quantitative research. The workshop does not require any specialized knowledge of programming. Participants will gain a foundation for incorporating reproducible, transparent practices into their current workflows.

Tue 11
Developments in Open Science in the Netherlands new Finished 10:00 - 11:00 Cambridge University Library, Sir Geoffrey Keynes Room

The Netherlands has been frontrunner in the transition to Open Science. The Dutch government has mandated all universities to have 100% Open Access to academic publications by 2024 and has recently broadened its scope to research data. These plans can only succeed by national cooperation of all parties involved.

The chairman of Tilburg University is one of three main negotiators with the publishers. As such, the university is expected to be leading the development of policies in Open Science and the monitoring of progress.

In this talk, Hylke Annema of Tilburg University will tell us about the current developments in the Netherlands and at Tilburg University.

Discussion among participants about best practices is highly encouraged.

Wed 12
Developments in Open Science in the Netherlands new Finished 16:00 - 17:00 17 Mill Lane, Seminar Room G

The Netherlands has been frontrunner in the transition to Open Science. The Dutch government has mandated all universities to have 100% Open Access to academic publications by 2024 and has recently broadened its scope to research data. These plans can only succeed by national cooperation of all parties involved.

The chairman of Tilburg University is one of three main negotiators with the publishers. As such, the university is expected to be leading the development of policies in Open Science and the monitoring of progress.

In this talk, Hylke Annema of Tilburg University will tell us about the current developments in the Netherlands and at Tilburg University.

Discussion among participants about best practices is highly encouraged.

Wed 19
‘I'm A Librarian’: The Superhero Approach To Engaging With Your Profession! new Finished 13:30 - 16:30 Wolfson College, Barton Road

Library and information professionals across all sectors are often involved in innovative and pioneering projects and initiatives, particularly in the fields of: library and information science; education, teaching and learning; research support; and scholarly communications. However, this work and practice often goes unnoticed by the outside world and in many cases the environments internal to the library itself.

This interactive workshop, led by Leo Appleton from Goldsmiths, University of London and Wendy Morris from Kingston University, will enable participants to consider their day to day work, how this has led to professional achievement and build their confidence in sharing these outcomes beyond the library echo chamber. Participants will then be invited to think about how they might celebrate such successes by sharing their best practice through various activities including conferences, publication and social media. By the end of the workshop participants will be aware of some of the platforms available to them and how professional pride and success can potentially be celebrated.

Fri 21
A Friendly Github Introduction Workshop new Finished 13:00 - 16:00 Department of Engineering, Library

This is a friendly introduction to Github – a free and open source platform that can help you build projects that are collaborative, well documented, and version-controlled.

In this workshop we will introduce you to the Github ecosystem and help you get you comfortable navigating basic Github workflows. We will make sure that you leave the workshop aware of the best practices for developing projects on Github (e.g. writing a good “readme” or posting and labeling issues) and an understanding of how Github can help make your projects more readable and accessible.

This workshop is developed for anyone looking for a solution to making projects – whether it be your research on arctic glaciers, the materials for an undergraduate course, your PHD thesis, or even a cookbook – more manageable. This workshop is geared towards all skill levels, but first-time and novice users are encouraged and prioritized.

Full details of this workshop can be found at: https://kirstiejane.github.io/friendly-github-intro/

Mon 24
You've Published, Now What?: Tools and Techniques for Promoting Research new Finished 10:00 - 11:00 Sidgwick Site, Raised Faculty Building, Room: 142

Getting published is just the first step…

Getting academic output published is a great accomplishment for any researcher but it’s not the end of the story. Promoting and sharing their work in a variety of ways can help to increase the impact of the original publication and can also be a useful tool for the library to show how their help is contributing.

This Librarian Toolkit session on helping researchers publish looks at the benefits of promoting research, the tools both researchers and librarians can use and how to link this with general advocacy for open research.

May 2017

Tue 2

What is Open Research, and what does it mean for you?

  • Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions?
  • Would you like to boost citations of your work?
  • Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants?

These are questions for academics at all stages of their research.

Join us to explore:

  • everything you need to know about Open Access and data sharing in the humanities, arts and social sciences
  • how to use the University's Repository, Apollo, to publish your research and gain citations
  • the training and advisory services offered by the OSC to facilitate your research and career development
Wed 3

What is Open Research, and what does it mean for you?

  • Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions?
  • Would you like to boost citations of your work?
  • Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants?

These are questions for academics at all stages of their research.

Join us to explore:

  • everything you need to know about Open Access and data sharing in STEM disciplines
  • how to use the University's Repository, Apollo, to publish your research and gain citations
  • the training and advisory services offered by the OSC to facilitate your research and career development
I Can Just Use This, Right? : a Copyright Survival Guide for Librarians new Finished 15:00 - 16:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

Are your students confused by copyright? Do you struggle to find the answers to their questions? You are not alone!

This final session of our Librarian Toolkit series on helping researchers to publish, this workshop will deal with common copyright questions which arise during the publication process. From including copyrighted work in a thesis to sharing published work on social networks copyright is a complex minefield and it can be hard to know where to start when giving advice.

This session for librarians will equip attendees with knowledge about third party copyright, making work available open access and how researchers can share their work legally online.

Tue 9
Research Data Management: Workshop (For GSLS PhD students) Finished 10:00 - 13:00 Cambridge University Library, Milstein Room

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research data?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

  • Where should you publish your research?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a journal for your work?
  • How do you respond to reviewers?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess a journal - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • What happens during peer-review
Wed 10
  • Where should you publish your research?
  • What publishing format should you choose?

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess the appropriateness of a journal for your research - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • How you can use other people’s copyrighted material
Thu 11
Meet the Funder! Data sharing in policy and practice with Cancer Research UK new Finished 13:00 - 15:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

Paola Quattroni from Cancer Research UK coming to run a workshop on 11th May.

This is a really good opportunity to influence the Cancer Research UK data policy and give feedback to your funder about the changes you would like to see. Paola will give a short talk and then the majority of the workshop will be given over to discussions and opportunities for researchers to feedback their experiences, problems and suggested solutions to enable more data sharing. As well as discussing data sharing Paola will also bring some data management plans so researchers can find out more about what they should and should not be putting in their grant applications.

Tue 16
  • Where should you publish your monograph or book chapter?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a publisher for your work?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Turning your thesis into a monograph
  • Choosing a publisher
  • Understanding the publication process
Wed 17

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics.

Explore:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research
Tue 23

Confused by copyright? You are not alone!

Copyright involves much more than checking how much you are photocopying, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Join the Office of Scholarly Communication as we answer your copyright queries, looking at:

  • Copyright transfer agreements
  • Creative Commons
  • 3rd party copyright
  • Open Access publisher requirements

The session will start with a 40 minute presentation, after which the time is open for you to raise questions and discuss issues you have encountered.

Emerging from the Chrysalis - Transforming Libraries for the Future new Finished 14:00 - 15:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 5

Join the OSC for an exciting opportunity to hear a preview of Dr Danny Kingsley's keynote for the upcoming CONUL2017 conference. Feedback on both the talk and the topic are encouraged!

Emerging from the Chrysalis - Transforming Libraries for the Future

Access to information has changed immeasurably in the past decade, bringing the traditional role of the academic library into question. Rather than a doomsday scenario, this situation offers huge potential for information professionals to situate the library at the heart of research support. 'Scholarly communication' is the umbrella term for the information exchange between research communities, research funders, the publishing industry and the general public. This talk will discuss the establishment of the Office of Scholarly Communication at Cambridge University, how it is now embedded within multiple administrative areas of the University and how it works collaboratively with the research community to identify areas that need expertise, support and services. By taking an open and transparent approach to this work, the Office of Scholarly Communication has had an impact not only within the institution, but nationally and internationally. This has not been without challenges, including working within a strict university governance system and managing unstable funding sources. However this work is now more important than ever at a time when academic publishers are investing substantially in research management and analytics businesses. Libraries that embrace the management of the unique work created within their own institution may find themselves central to the research institution of the future. The alternative could be obsolescence.

Wed 24

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research data?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Tue 30

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research

June 2017

Wed 7

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much information would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research information?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Wed 21
Reflective Practice Workshop (For Librarians) new Finished 14:30 - 16:30 Cambridge University Library, Milstein Room

Being a reflective practitioner is something that doesn’t come naturally for many of us but it can be a surprisingly easy skill to develop. As well as helping you to think critically about yourself and your service, being able to reflect can help you to deal with feedback, prepare you for job interviews and become more confident.

This interactive workshop will help you to understand the theory of reflective practice and how to translate this into your everyday role. It will provide tips for overcoming barriers to carrying out reflection and how to deal with feedback as well as offering a brief introduction to reflective writing.

July 2017

Mon 10
Open Access: What College Librarians Need to Know (Webinar) new Finished 15:00 - 16:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

Join the OSC for an introduction to Open Access

Open Access can be complicated, especially when you're dealing with researchers from across disciplines. This introductory session on Open Access is specifically tailored to the needs of Cambridge college library staff working with a range of different users although anyone wanting a refresher on Open Access is welcome to attend.

The first in our "Librarian Toolkit" webinar series on Open Access will cover topics such as what Open Access is, why it's important and how college librarians can support their users in sharing their work.

Wed 12
Text and Data Mining Symposium new charged Finished 10:30 - 17:30 Department of Engineering, Lecture Room 5

The nature of research is changing. What is the potential of text & data mining (TDM)to impact on this? How are researchers today using TDM to cope with the ever-increasing amount of information available? Are funder and publisher policies adapting to reflect both the legal right UK researcher have to mine published literature and the new possibilities TDM now present? These are some of the questions we will be asking in this day of talks, workshops and discussions.

Join plenary speaker Kiera McNeice of the FutureTDM project, Cambridge researchers and the National Centre for Text Mining, along with guest speakers from UCL, PLOS and more to discover:

  • practical tips for TDM
  • what TDM tools are available
  • advice on supporting researchers using, or considering using, TDM
  • improving the quality of research through TDM
  • innovations in TDM – new uses for technologies in research

Coffee and lunch will be provided and the day will end with a summer drinks reception.

There is a charge for this event. These charges are:

  • £10 for University of Cambridge members
  • £50 for all other attendees

Once you have booked your place here, please follow this link to make your payment: http://onlinesales.admin.cam.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/university-library/text-data-mining-symposium/text-data-mining-symposium

Can't make the symposium? Watch the opening Plenary and closing roundtable discussions via live-stream from 11:00 on Wednesday 12 July by following this link: http://cam.adobeconnect.com/osc2/ Simply select to 'Enter as Guest' (no need to create an Adobe Connect account).

You can also catch up when the recordings are available on the Office of Scholarly Communication 'Recordings of Past Events' page: http://osc.cam.ac.uk/events/recordings-past-events

A program for the day can be found here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1l4N2fSFgpL3iMbjKC3IxHz7GpNVvERB5NzxqWp8jZQo/edit?usp=sharing

Wed 19
Open Access Update 2017 (Webinar) new Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

What's new in Open Access for 2017?

Open Access is a fast moving area but it can be hard to find the time to keep up. This second session in our "Librarian Toolkit" webinar series on Open Access offers a brief update on the biggest changes both within Cambridge and the wider world in the last year.

Fri 28
Open Access for Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences Librarians (Webinar) new Finished 10:00 - 11:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

Join the OSC for a discussion of Open Access issues relevant to HASS librarians

The Open Access message has been geared towards sharing academic outputs like journal articles and their underlying data as well as being mandated by funders but how do you promote Open Access if none of these areas apply to your work?

This final webinar in our "Librarian Toolkit" series on Open Access will address Open Access from the perspective of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences librarians and cover topics such as Open Access monographs, the implications of not having a funder and places to share your work.

September 2017

Tue 5
Research Data Management: Workshop (For GSLS PhD students) Finished 13:00 - 17:00 Postdoc Centre, Seminar Room @ Biomedical Campus

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research data?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Mon 25
How to Spot a Predatory Publisher new CANCELLED 10:00 - 11:00 Cambridge University Library, Training Room

'Dear esteemed author…'

So-called predatory publishers regularly approach researchers via email to solicit manuscripts and conference papers. With the emphasis on publishing as a measure of academic success still strong it can be easy to give in to temptation and flattery but this can do more harm than good to a future career.

This session will look at the problem of predatory publishers using case studies. Attendees will be given tips on how to spot a predatory publisher or conference and the best advice to offer if one of their researchers has been approached.

October 2017

Tue 31
Research Data Management: Workshop (For GSLS PhD students) [Places] 10:00 - 15:00 Cambridge University Library, Milstein Room

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research data?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.