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Office of Scholarly Communication course timetable

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Tue 28 May – Fri 15 Nov

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May 2019

Tue 28
Copyright: a survival guide (for PhD students in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences) Finished 11:00 - 12:00 Sidgwick Site, Alison Richard Building, SG1

Confused by copyright? You are not alone!

Copyright involves much more than checking how much you are photocopying, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Join the Office of Scholarly Communication as we answer your copyright queries, looking at:

  • Copyright transfer agreements
  • Creative Commons
  • 3rd party copyright
  • Open Access publisher requirements

The session will start with a 40 minute presentation, after which the time is open for you to raise questions and discuss issues you have encountered.

Peer-reviewed journals: what you need to know about publishing (for the Faculty of Education) new Finished 11:00 - 12:30 Faculty of Education, 184 Hills Road, 1S3

This course answers all the questions that come up when you start to publish your research in academic journals. It will be a fast-paced overview of the publishing process, from choosing a journal to dealing with peer-review. We will also explore some recent developments in the publishing landscape: the preregistration of trials and preprints. By the end of the session, publishing will seem less daunting and you will be able to avoid of common pitfalls.

Publishing a book: what, where, when and how? (for the Faculty of Education) new Finished 13:00 - 14:30 Faculty of Education, 184 Hills Road, 1S3

Many researchers consider publishing a book, often in the form of a monograph, and the process can be daunting the first time around. You will get the starter-kit to get your idea off the ground, with a collection of tips and tools to make your life easier. By the end of the session, you'll have the basic knowledge -and more importantly the confidence- to take your publishing project further.

June 2019

Tue 4

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research
Mon 10

This course covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021.

We will introduce the principles of open access and open research, and guide you through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. We will demonstrate key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload. There will be plenty of time in the session to ask questions, and for you to try out uploading papers.

This course will be useful to you if you:

  • administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access
  • manage Symplectic profiles
Tue 11

If you have recently started receiving peer reviews, or would like to become a reviewer, this is an unmissable chance to pick up tips and best practices for responding to reviews, being noticed as a reviewer, getting your review done, and getting credit for your work

The Office of Scholarly Communication invites you to an essential introduction to Peer Review.

You'll learn...

  • how to make the most of the peer review process
  • how to increase the chance of being asked to review
  • how to get ready to review and be recognized for your work
  • how to write the feedback you wish you'd received.
Thu 13
How to make your research reproducible (a workshop) CANCELLED new CANCELLED 14:00 - 15:30 Faculty of Education, 184 Hills Road, GS5

Helene Brinken (University of Gottingen, FOSTER) will guide you through workflows, tools and resources to help you embed open research into your research practices.

This session will take place in 1S4 Computer Room, Faculty of Education.

More information to follow.

Following the workshop, you are invited to stay for our event Reproducibility in action: improving research in the life and social sciences.

Reproducibility in action: improving open research in the life and social sciences new Finished 15:00 - 17:00 Faculty of Education, 184 Hills Road, GS5

Open research not only furthers the global reach of your work, it accelerates the pursuit of knowledge and fosters truly international collaboration. The University of Cambridge promotes and supports open research, so how do you embed open research into your working practices?

The Office of Scholarly Communication invites you to learn more about exciting initiatives in the life and social sciences that are already changing research culture by enabling collaboration, improving access to knowledge, and putting transparency and reproducibility at the forefront of research.

  • Professor Chris Chambers (University of Cardiff) will introduce Registered Reports, a format of preregistered empirical publication in which peer review happens prior to data collection and analysis. Registered Reports aim to eradicate a variety of questionable research practices, including low statistical power, selective reporting of results, and publication bias, while allowing complete flexibility to report serendipitous findings. The initiative has been taken up by over 190 journals, including Cortex, outlets in the Nature group, generalist journals including Royal Society Open Science, and emerging clinical trial formats. Professor Chambers will discuss early evidence of impacts on the field and emerging Registered Report funding models in which journals and funders simultaneously assess proposed protocols.
  • Professor Benedict Jones (University of Glasgow) leads the first Psychological Science Accelerator project, a globally distributed network of psychological science laboratories (currently over 400), representing over 50 countries on all six populated continents, that coordinates data collection for democratically selected studies. Discover how this diverse and inclusive project is accelerating the accumulation of reliable and generalizable evidence in psychological science, reducing the distance between truth about human behavior and mental processes and our current understanding.

Our speakers will also explore a range of allied initiatives, including the newly established UK Reproducibility Network. We will invite you to share your own experiences, questions and ideas.

Join us at 3pm for afternoon tea and a chance to network with our speakers and open advocates from the University community. Talks will begin at 3.30pm.

Wed 19
Mirror, Mirror: the Growth of Mirror Journals (for librarians) new Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

Solving the problem of Open Access or causing more trouble?

Open Access can be hard to understand at the best of times but one term that causes particular confusion is ‘mirror journals’. Promoted as one way of solving the problem of a lack of publisher interest in Open Access, these titles are appearing in every discipline but what are they?

Join the OSC for this information webinar to find out all about mirror journals, their history, the problems they can solve and those that they can potentially cause!

July 2019

Thu 11

This course covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021.

We will introduce the principles of open access and open research, and guide you through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. We will demonstrate key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload. There will be plenty of time in the session to ask questions, and for you to try out uploading papers.

This course will be useful to you if you:

  • administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access
  • manage Symplectic profiles
Wed 17
Open Access Update 2019 (for librarians) new Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

What’s new in Open Access for 2019?

Open Access is a fast moving area but it can be hard to find time to keep up with the latest developments. This session offers a brief update on the biggest changes both within Cambridge and the wider world in the last year.

August 2019

Fri 16

This course covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021.

We will introduce the principles of open access and open research, and guide you through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. We will demonstrate key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload. There will be plenty of time in the session to ask questions, and for you to try out uploading papers.

This course will be useful to you if you:

  • administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access
  • manage Symplectic profiles
Wed 21
Creating the Perfect Recipe: Creative Commons Cookbook (for librarians) new Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

How do you create the perfect copyright recipe?

Creative Commons licenses sit alongside existing copyright regulations as a way to help researchers use existing creations and share their own work with others. This webinar will explore the history of the Creative Commons movement, explore how the licenses can be put together and how librarians can encourage their researchers to use them to their best advantage.

September 2019

Wed 11

This course covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021.

We will introduce the principles of open access and open research, and guide you through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. We will demonstrate key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload. There will be plenty of time in the session to ask questions, and for you to try out uploading papers.

This course will be useful to you if you:

  • administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access
  • manage Symplectic profiles
Wed 18
Publish and Perish? : How to Spot a Predatory Publisher (for librarians) new Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

Dear esteemed author...

So-called predatory publishers regularly approach researchers via email to solicit manuscripts and conference papers. With the emphasis on publishing as a measure of academic success still strong it can be easy to give in to temptation and flattery but this can do more harm than good to a future career.

This session will look at whether these publishers are a problem, how to spot a potential problem publisher or conference and the best advice to offer researchers if they are approached.

October 2019

Wed 2
Open Access Monographs: from policy to reality (a one-day symposium) Finished 09:00 - 17:00 St Catharine's College, McGrath Centre

A detailed programme schedule can be found further below. Alternatively you can download a copy.

Practical information regarding the event is also available. Please download a copy.

The publication of books in Open Access format has been under discussion for several years, and has attracted interest especially from researchers in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. Questions around the topic abound in light of developments including Plan S, changing funder policy and proposed requirements for the next REF.  

This one-day symposium is aimed primarily at researchers, postgraduate students, librarians and research support staff from the University of Cambridge, but it is also open to the public. It will explore the policies, economics and future directions of Open Monograph publishing. Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss innovations in the sector, share their enthusiasms and concerns about current developments, and learn more about the opportunities for and realities of publishing an open access book. 

IMPORTANT BOOKING INFORMATION: This event is free of charge for participants who have a Raven password and booking can be made directly from this webpage. For those who do not have a Raven password there will be a charge of £50 to attend the event. Please visit our esales form to make a booking. Please note that bookings via the esales form will close on 25 September at 11pm and bookings via UTBS (Raven password) on Tuesday 1 October noon (or earlier if we reach full capacity). Unfortunately, we cannot guarantee any dietary requirements (apart from vegetarian) for bookings made after 25 September.

Programme highlights:

Professor Martin Paul Eve (Birkbeck, University of London) will present on the economics and political-economics of open-access monograph publishing.

Professor Margot Finn (President of the Royal Historical Society) will discuss open monographs from the perspectives of the RHS.

Panel session 1: ‘Policy and practice: Moving towards Plan S and REF’. Chair: Dr Steven Hill (Director of Research, Research England). Panel: Prof Martin Paul Eve (Birkbeck, University of London), Prof Margot Finn (President of RHS), Hannah Hope (Open Research Coordinator, Wellcome Trust), Prof Roger Kain (School of Advanced Study, University of London & Chairman of the UUK OA Monographs Group) 

Panel session 2: ‘Innovations in open monograph publishing’. Chair: Patricia Killiard (Deputy Director, Academic Services, Cambridge University Libraries). Panel includes representatives from: Cambridge University Press, UCL Press, Open Book Publishers, Springer Nature and Radical Open Access 

Mon 7

This course covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021.

We will introduce the principles of open access and open research, and guide you through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. We will demonstrate key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload. There will be plenty of time in the session to ask questions, and for you to try out uploading papers.

This course will be useful to you if you:

  • administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access
  • manage Symplectic profiles
Thu 17

Have you ever wondered who can access your research? Most articles and research outputs are locked up behind paywalls inside an ivory tower. Find out how to make your practice more open to reach a broader audience, spark collaborations and, most importantly, improve the quality of your research.

Tue 22
Lunch and chat about Open Research (for PhD students in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences) new Finished 12:30 - 13:30 Student Services Centre, Exams Hall, Room AG03a

We want to hear YOUR views on research. Who owns your work? Who should access it? How does your research compare to other disciplines?

Come along for a free lunch and to discuss how the University can support you in practicing Open Research. Learn about the requirements placed on researchers and the tools you could use to boost your impact. Find out what your peers think and contribute to shaping a University-wide strategy for Open Research training.

Thu 24
Planning for Plan S: a perspective from across the pond Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

The principles of Plan S are set to change what funders require from researchers, placing a much greater emphasis on immediate Open Access and other open practices. While we've been busy preparing here in the UK, our colleagues in the US have not been idle.

Micah Vandegrift is the Open Knowledge Librarian at NC State University Libraries, where he works on community-building and advocating for Open Research. He will be sharing his perspective on the likely impact of Plan S on libraries, publishers, researchers and repositories.

Format: 20-30 minutes talk, followed by an opportunity to discuss these issues with others in the room.

Refreshments will be available from 11:30. Join us for an informal chat before the talk.

Resources: if you would like to refresh your knowledge of Plan S before the seminar, check out our Plan S Factsheet (https://osc.cam.ac.uk/files/copy_of_plan_s.pdf) and webinar (https://osc.cam.ac.uk/training/supporting-researchers-21st-century-programme/wednesday-webinars).

Thu 31

Prevent research disasters through good data management

  • How much information would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research information?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from literature sources, interviews, measurements, numbers and images.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

November 2019

Thu 7

Publishing journal articles is a key element of a successful research career. As you are starting on this journey, you may have a lot of questions, for example:

  • Where and how should I publish my research?
  • How do I maximise the number of readers and citations?
  • How should I respond to reviewers?
Fri 8

This course covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021.

We will introduce the principles of open access and open research, and guide you through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. We will demonstrate key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload. There will be plenty of time in the session to ask questions.

This course will be useful to you if you:

  • administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access
  • manage Symplectic profiles
Thu 14

Seeing your name on the spine of a book is a great achievement, which can help to kick start your career in some disciplines. How do you get there?

This session answers some of the key questions along the way, including including:

  • Should you turn your thesis into a monograph?
  • How do you choose a publisher?
  • How do you get your proposal accepted?
  • What are the key stages in the publication process?
Fri 15

Have you ever wondered who can access your research? Most articles and research outputs are locked up behind paywalls inside an ivory tower. Find out how to make your practice more open to reach a broader audience, spark collaborations and, most importantly, improve the quality of your research.