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Office of Scholarly Communication course timetable

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Tue 30 Apr – Wed 18 Sep

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April 2019

Tue 30
  • Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, and use open materials from other researchers, without paywall restrictions?
  • Would you like to boost citations of your work and increase collaboration?
  • Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants?

These are questions for postgraduate students at all stages of their research.

Research in the 21st century is changing at a rapid pace and it can be hard to keep up with this dynamic and fast-paced environment. There are more pressures on researchers than ever before, including mandates around Open Access and data sharing as well as extra pressure to boost citations to secure the next role.

The University of Cambridge has recently committed to promoting and supporting Open Research, and understanding the basics of 'what it is' is now essential for researchers. This introductory session will help you navigate this complex landscape including the benefits of Open Access, how to use the University’s repository to publish research and boost your citations, and how to comply with the new regulations.

May 2019

Wed 1

Everything you need to know about the ongoing shift towards openness in research. Open Research encompasses more than just making publications Open Access, it is a movement that strives to make research more transparent, reproducible and accessible. There will be an opportunity to discuss the benefits of (and barriers to) making your research outputs more widely available, from articles and books to data and resources. You will learn about the University's position on Open Research and the multitude of ways it can support you in this arena.

Venue: DMB GS1

You will learn how to manage digital information, which includes quantitative data, interview transcripts, observations, the results of searches, and more. The content is focused on practical solutions and tools available at the University of Cambridge. By the end of the session, you will be in a better position to organise the information well, share it safely and preserve it for the future. You will possess all the knowledge needed to create a solid data management plan.

Venue: DMB GS1

Tue 7

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much information would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research information?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Thu 9

If you have recently started peer reviewing, or are ready to get involved, this is an unmissable chance to pick up tips and best practices from PLOS, publishers of the world's largest multi-disciplinary peer-reviewed journal.

The Office of Scholarly Communication invites you to join PLOS for an essential introduction to Peer Review.

You'll learn...

  • the 3 questions you should always ask yourself when you're asked to do a review
  • how to get ready to review and be recognized for your work
  • how to read a manuscript with peer review in mind
  • how to write the feedback you wish you'd received.

Stay on after the workshop to chat to PLOS staff and editors and enjoy light refreshments.

Tue 14
  • Where should you publish your research?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a journal for your work?
  • How do you respond to reviewers?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess a journal - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • What happens during peer-review
Wed 15
So Many Shades of Grey: Using Your Judgement to Answer Copyright Queries (for librarians) new Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

Nothing with copyright is ever simple, so how do you know where to start?

From the fair dealing to sharing your research online, it seems that nothing with copyright is ever simple. There are few black and white rules about copyright but there are consequences for getting something wrong!

This webinar will cover some of the most common grey areas in copyright such as fair dealing and expiry dates and offer librarians some strategies to make decisions and help advise their research community on copyright issues.

Mon 20

This course covers copyright from the perspective as academics, both as copyright holders and users of copyrighted materials. We will look at how other people's works can be reused legally in a University context. In particular, we will consider common issues that arise when publishing in journals. You will learn how to use copyright and Creative Commons licenses to make sure your work is protected appropriately and shareable whenever possible. This course is designed for the Faculty of Education and priority will be given to these Faculty members.

Venue: DMB GS1

This course will give you the confidence and tools to promote your research more effectively to a variety of audiences. We will explore how to reach more colleagues and increase your chances of being cited. We will also examine how to publicise your work more widely and reach the public. You will discover some tools to help you disseminate your research and track its impact. There will also be an opportunity to reflect on which solutions are the most practical and most likely to succeed in your circumstances.

Venue: DMB GS1

Tue 21
  • Where should you publish your monograph or book chapter?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a publisher for your work?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Turning your thesis into a monograph
  • Choosing a publisher
  • Understanding the publication process
Tue 28
Copyright: a survival guide (for PhD students in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences) Finished 11:00 - 12:00 Sidgwick Site, Alison Richard Building, SG1

Confused by copyright? You are not alone!

Copyright involves much more than checking how much you are photocopying, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Join the Office of Scholarly Communication as we answer your copyright queries, looking at:

  • Copyright transfer agreements
  • Creative Commons
  • 3rd party copyright
  • Open Access publisher requirements

The session will start with a 40 minute presentation, after which the time is open for you to raise questions and discuss issues you have encountered.

Peer-reviewed journals: what you need to know about publishing (for the Faculty of Education) new Finished 11:00 - 12:30 Faculty of Education, 184 Hills Road, 1S3

This course answers all the questions that come up when you start to publish your research in academic journals. It will be a fast-paced overview of the publishing process, from choosing a journal to dealing with peer-review. We will also explore some recent developments in the publishing landscape: the preregistration of trials and preprints. By the end of the session, publishing will seem less daunting and you will be able to avoid of common pitfalls.

Publishing a book: what, where, when and how? (for the Faculty of Education) new Finished 13:00 - 14:30 Faculty of Education, 184 Hills Road, 1S3

Many researchers consider publishing a book, often in the form of a monograph, and the process can be daunting the first time around. You will get the starter-kit to get your idea off the ground, with a collection of tips and tools to make your life easier. By the end of the session, you'll have the basic knowledge -and more importantly the confidence- to take your publishing project further.

June 2019

Tue 4

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research
Mon 10

This course covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021.

We will introduce the principles of open access and open research, and guide you through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. We will demonstrate key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload. There will be plenty of time in the session to ask questions, and for you to try out uploading papers.

This course will be useful to you if you:

  • administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access
  • manage Symplectic profiles
Tue 11

If you have recently started receiving peer reviews, or would like to become a reviewer, this is an unmissable chance to pick up tips and best practices for responding to reviews, being noticed as a reviewer, getting your review done, and getting credit for your work

The Office of Scholarly Communication invites you to an essential introduction to Peer Review.

You'll learn...

  • how to make the most of the peer review process
  • how to increase the chance of being asked to review
  • how to get ready to review and be recognized for your work
  • how to write the feedback you wish you'd received.
Thu 13
How to make your research reproducible (a workshop) CANCELLED new CANCELLED 14:00 - 15:30 Faculty of Education, 184 Hills Road, GS5

Helene Brinken (University of Gottingen, FOSTER) will guide you through workflows, tools and resources to help you embed open research into your research practices.

This session will take place in 1S4 Computer Room, Faculty of Education.

More information to follow.

Following the workshop, you are invited to stay for our event Reproducibility in action: improving research in the life and social sciences.

Reproducibility in action: improving open research in the life and social sciences new Finished 15:00 - 17:00 Faculty of Education, 184 Hills Road, GS5

Open research not only furthers the global reach of your work, it accelerates the pursuit of knowledge and fosters truly international collaboration. The University of Cambridge promotes and supports open research, so how do you embed open research into your working practices?

The Office of Scholarly Communication invites you to learn more about exciting initiatives in the life and social sciences that are already changing research culture by enabling collaboration, improving access to knowledge, and putting transparency and reproducibility at the forefront of research.

  • Professor Chris Chambers (University of Cardiff) will introduce Registered Reports, a format of preregistered empirical publication in which peer review happens prior to data collection and analysis. Registered Reports aim to eradicate a variety of questionable research practices, including low statistical power, selective reporting of results, and publication bias, while allowing complete flexibility to report serendipitous findings. The initiative has been taken up by over 190 journals, including Cortex, outlets in the Nature group, generalist journals including Royal Society Open Science, and emerging clinical trial formats. Professor Chambers will discuss early evidence of impacts on the field and emerging Registered Report funding models in which journals and funders simultaneously assess proposed protocols.
  • Professor Benedict Jones (University of Glasgow) leads the first Psychological Science Accelerator project, a globally distributed network of psychological science laboratories (currently over 400), representing over 50 countries on all six populated continents, that coordinates data collection for democratically selected studies. Discover how this diverse and inclusive project is accelerating the accumulation of reliable and generalizable evidence in psychological science, reducing the distance between truth about human behavior and mental processes and our current understanding.

Our speakers will also explore a range of allied initiatives, including the newly established UK Reproducibility Network. We will invite you to share your own experiences, questions and ideas.

Join us at 3pm for afternoon tea and a chance to network with our speakers and open advocates from the University community. Talks will begin at 3.30pm.

Wed 19
Mirror, Mirror: the Growth of Mirror Journals (for librarians) new Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

Solving the problem of Open Access or causing more trouble?

Open Access can be hard to understand at the best of times but one term that causes particular confusion is ‘mirror journals’. Promoted as one way of solving the problem of a lack of publisher interest in Open Access, these titles are appearing in every discipline but what are they?

Join the OSC for this information webinar to find out all about mirror journals, their history, the problems they can solve and those that they can potentially cause!

July 2019

Thu 11

This course covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021.

We will introduce the principles of open access and open research, and guide you through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. We will demonstrate key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload. There will be plenty of time in the session to ask questions, and for you to try out uploading papers.

This course will be useful to you if you:

  • administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access
  • manage Symplectic profiles
Wed 17
Open Access Update 2019 (for librarians) new Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

What’s new in Open Access for 2019?

Open Access is a fast moving area but it can be hard to find time to keep up with the latest developments. This session offers a brief update on the biggest changes both within Cambridge and the wider world in the last year.

August 2019

Fri 16

This course covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021.

We will introduce the principles of open access and open research, and guide you through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. We will demonstrate key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload. There will be plenty of time in the session to ask questions, and for you to try out uploading papers.

This course will be useful to you if you:

  • administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access
  • manage Symplectic profiles
Wed 21
Creating the Perfect Recipe: Creative Commons Cookbook (for librarians) new Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

How do you create the perfect copyright recipe?

Creative Commons licenses sit alongside existing copyright regulations as a way to help researchers use existing creations and share their own work with others. This webinar will explore the history of the Creative Commons movement, explore how the licenses can be put together and how librarians can encourage their researchers to use them to their best advantage.

September 2019

Wed 11

This course covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021.

We will introduce the principles of open access and open research, and guide you through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. We will demonstrate key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload. There will be plenty of time in the session to ask questions, and for you to try out uploading papers.

This course will be useful to you if you:

  • administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access
  • manage Symplectic profiles
Wed 18
Publish and Perish? : How to Spot a Predatory Publisher (for librarians) new Finished 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

Dear esteemed author...

So-called predatory publishers regularly approach researchers via email to solicit manuscripts and conference papers. With the emphasis on publishing as a measure of academic success still strong it can be easy to give in to temptation and flattery but this can do more harm than good to a future career.

This session will look at whether these publishers are a problem, how to spot a potential problem publisher or conference and the best advice to offer researchers if they are approached.