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OSC Researcher Training 2017-2018

Programme of events provided by Office of Scholarly Communication
(Tue 17 Oct 2017 - Wed 13 Jun 2018)

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Tue 17 Oct 2017 – Wed 13 Jun 2018

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October 2017

Tue 17
  • Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions?
  • Would you like to boost citations of your work?
  • Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants?

These are questions for postgraduate students at all stages of their research.

Tue 24

Confused by copyright? You are not alone!

Copyright involves much more than checking how much you are photocopying, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Join the Office of Scholarly Communication as we answer your copyright queries, looking at:

  • Copyright transfer agreements
  • Creative Commons
  • 3rd party copyright
  • Open Access publisher requirements
Wed 25

Join us for the third in our series exploring resources to help with the process of publishing your research - from recording observations to editing to peer review. For the first time, this event focuses exclusively on research in the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences subjects.

This session offers the chance to learn about available tools and options in publishing and reviewing, and ask questions of the experts.

Featuring:

  • independent and not-for-profit media outlet The Conversation (Gemma Ware)
  • searching for a suitable platform, publisher requirements and experiences so far in publishing with Open Humanities Press (James Purdon)
  • jargon-free and accessible - high quality peer-reviewed open access publishing with Languages, Society and Policy (Dr Dora Alexopoulou and Dr Lisa-Maria Mueller)
  • publishing with Cambridge University Press (Chris Harrison, CUP)
  • book processing charges and open access publishing for all with UCL Press (Lara Speicher)

and more.

You can find a Programme for the day here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1U__5VEx6XORfz8MF9JWXw1maujXPyCEo8MxvUq4qIlE/edit?usp=sharing

Morning refreshments and lunch will be provided, during which time you can speak to providers for information and user support.

Fri 27

Join us for the fourth in our series exploring resources to help with the process of publishing your research in STEM disciplines - from recording observations to editing to peer review.

This session offers the chance to learn about available tools and options in publishing and reviewing, and ask questions of the experts.

Featuring contributions from:

  • independent and not-for-profit media outlet The Conversation (Miriam Frankel)
  • local solutions with Cambridge University Press (Chris Harrison)
  • Aperta and changing the way we publish with PLOS (Nicola Stead)
  • Open Access with Scholastica (Brian Cody)

and more!

Morning refreshments and lunch will be provided, during which time you can speak to providers for information and user support.

We will be recording and sharing these presentations for all those who are unable to attend on the day.

You can find a programme for this event here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1j07XgHK5MOfLcvVZiIf3xnoGI0EcgJr1hRWIaO0AUDI/edit?usp=sharing

Thanks to PLOS for their sponsorship of this event.

Tue 31

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics.

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much data would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research data?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

November 2017

Tue 7

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much information would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research information?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Tue 14
  • Where should you publish your research?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a journal for your work?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess a journal - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • How you can use other people’s copyrighted material
Tue 21
  • Where should you publish your monograph or book chapter?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a publisher for your work?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively.

December 2017

Mon 4
Managing your research data effectively and working reproducibly new Finished 14:00 - 16:00 Department of Geography, Downing Site

Feeling lost in getting started on data management?

Attend the workshop to get inspired and started on how to structure, backup and describe your data.

This workshop (for students in the area of physical and human geography, as well as STEM subjects generally) will work through the challenges around managing research data as well as the benefits of working reproducibly. Participants will be provided with guidance and resources on how to effectively manage projects and avoid data loss throughout the research process.

You will hear of what can happen if researchers do not manage their data well as well as what happens to research data after the end of a project, such as how to share and store data in a long-term and sustainable way. It is never too early to start thinking about these things, so get a head start on your research data management practices now!

Department of Geography, Seminar Room

Tue 5

David Carr and Robert Kiley from the Wellcome Trust are coming to Cambridge to talk with researchers about the Trust’s policy on data, software and materials management and sharing, which was released in July 2017. They will give short talks about the extended requirements for sharing all research outputs and an update on how their policy on open research has been working. Afterwards you will have the opportunity to ask them any questions you might have.

This event will be held in the Gurdon Institute tea-room.

February 2018

Thu 1
  • Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions?
  • Would you like to boost citations of your work?
  • Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants?

These are questions for postgraduate students at all stages of their research.

Thu 8

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much information would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research information?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Thu 15

Confused by copyright? You are not alone!

Copyright involves much more than checking how much you are photocopying, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Join the Office of Scholarly Communication as we answer your copyright queries, looking at:

  • Copyright transfer agreements
  • Creative Commons
  • 3rd party copyright
  • Open Access publisher requirements

The session will start with a 40 minute presentation, after which the time is open for you to raise questions and discuss issues you have encountered.

Thu 22
  • Where should you publish your research?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a journal for your work?
  • How do you respond to reviewers?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess a journal - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • What happens during peer-review
Tue 27
The Publishing Trap (for PhD students and researchers) new Finished 10:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 11

The Publishing Trap is a board game designed to introduce researchers to scholarly publishing. Looking at the world of scholarly communication, this interactive game aims to offer researchers a better understanding of the implications of copyright on the publication process. Players will be guided through the different stages of a researcher career from PhD submission to Professorship, making decisions on a range of scenarios. The aim of the game is to develop an understanding of how money, copyright and publishing models will impact an academic career.

Learn more about the game here: https://copyrightliteracy.org/resources/the-publishing-trap/

The Publishing Trap was designed by Dr Jane Secker and Chris Morrison (UK Copyright Literacy) and is used under a CC-BY-NC-ND licence.

March 2018

Thu 1
  • Where should you publish your monograph or book chapter?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a publisher for your work?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Turning your thesis into a monograph
  • Choosing a publisher
  • Understanding the publication process
Thu 8

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research
Software Licensing Workshop new Finished 13:00 - 14:00 Cancer Research UK Cambridge Research Institute, Seminar Theatre 001

Have you produced your own software? Did you know you can decide how others can reuse and share it? Do you know that there are a range of licences that you could apply to your work that determine how it can be used?

This workshop will explore why you should licence your software clearly and how to do so. A range of different licences will be explained as well as tools that can help you decide. Join the Research Data Management Facility and Neil Chue Hong from the Software Sustainability Institute to talk in detail about software licences.

May 2018

Wed 9
  • Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, without paywall restrictions?
  • Would you like to boost citations of your work?
  • Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants?

These are questions for postgraduate students at all stages of their research.

Wed 16

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much information would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research information?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Wed 23

Confused by copyright? You are not alone!

Copyright involves much more than checking how much you are photocopying, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Join the Office of Scholarly Communication as we answer your copyright queries, looking at:

  • Copyright transfer agreements
  • Creative Commons
  • 3rd party copyright
  • Open Access publisher requirements

The session will start with a 40 minute presentation, after which the time is open for you to raise questions and discuss issues you have encountered.

Wed 30
  • Where should you publish your research?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a journal for your work?
  • How do you respond to reviewers?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess a journal - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • What happens during peer-review

June 2018

Wed 6
  • Where should you publish your monograph or book chapter?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a publisher for your work?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Turning your thesis into a monograph
  • Choosing a publisher
  • Understanding the publication process
Wed 13

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research