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University Information Services course timetable

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Wed 21 Mar 2018 – Tue 24 Apr 2018

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Wednesday 21 March 2018

09:00
Efficient Parallel IO on ARCHER new (3 of 4) Finished 09:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site
  • Please note that although this course is being hosted at Cambridge, it is being organised and run by EPCC at the University of Edinburgh.
  • This hands-on course explores a range of issues related to parallel IO. It uses ARCHER and its parallel Lustre file system as a platform for the exercises; however, almost all the IO concepts and performance considerations are applicable to any parallel system.
  • The first day of the course will cover the MPI-IO standard, developing IO routines for a regular domain decomposition example. It will also briefly cover higher-level standards such as HDF5 and NetCDF which are built on top of MPI-IO.
  • The second day will concentrate on performance, covering how to configure the parallel file system and tune the MPI-IO library for best performance. Case studies from real codes will be presented.
  • To book a place on this course please complete their online registration form which can be found here along with a full description of the course.
14:00
Efficient Parallel IO on ARCHER new (4 of 4) Finished 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site
  • Please note that although this course is being hosted at Cambridge, it is being organised and run by EPCC at the University of Edinburgh.
  • This hands-on course explores a range of issues related to parallel IO. It uses ARCHER and its parallel Lustre file system as a platform for the exercises; however, almost all the IO concepts and performance considerations are applicable to any parallel system.
  • The first day of the course will cover the MPI-IO standard, developing IO routines for a regular domain decomposition example. It will also briefly cover higher-level standards such as HDF5 and NetCDF which are built on top of MPI-IO.
  • The second day will concentrate on performance, covering how to configure the parallel file system and tune the MPI-IO library for best performance. Case studies from real codes will be presented.
  • To book a place on this course please complete their online registration form which can be found here along with a full description of the course.
14:15
TechLink Community Seminar: Making IT Agile: Control vs Collaboration new Finished 14:15 - 16:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Norwich Auditorium

Improving the way we deliver software depends on the way we approach software development. Evolving an agile environment requires establishing Firm Foundations, and building incrementally to deliver real operational benefit as early as is practical. Although it is essential to be in control of a software project, it is vital to ensure transparency of work being performed, and have clear and continuous communication for teams. As such, terms such as ‘control’ and ‘collaboration’ can sound like competing principles, maybe like ‘waterfall’ and ‘agile’. In reality, in a working agile environment, control is not something imposed from outside, but is generated from within, through collaborative working practices. The nexus of collaboration encompasses the entire business context, and automatically produces the best possible result. All that is left is to monitor its success! Working with principles, enables keeping what is best, and continuously improving everything else.

Presenters

  • Sibel Allinson, Senior Project Manager, University Information Services
  • Nick Mattin, Head of Service Development, University Information Services
  • Simon Redhead, Systems Development Manager

Thursday 22 March 2018

09:30
Office 2016: Excel, Word and PowerPoint Top Ten Tips (1 of 3) Finished 09:30 - 10:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

Haven't had the time to fully explore all that Excel, Word and PowerPoint has to offer? If so, now's your chance to pick up a few handy tips that you may not have discovered yet. You can save a lot of time and effort working with Excel, Word and PowerPoint if you know a few tricks and shortcuts.

High Performance Computing: An Introduction (1 of 2) Finished 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

The course aims to give an introductory overview of High Performance Computing (HPC) in general, and of the facilities of the High Performance Computing Service (HPCS) in particular.

Practical examples of using the HPCS clusters will be used throughout, although it is hoped that much of the content will have applicability to systems elsewhere.

Analysing Business Processes: Where Do I Start? new Finished 09:30 - 11:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Huntingdon Room

This short session will provide an understanding of the principles, tools and techniques involved in Process Analysis with a view to improving business process effectiveness and efficiency. Delegates will have the opportunity to practice using the techniques that they learn via exercises designed to be enjoyable and thought provoking.

The course refers to the methodology used in conjunction with Triaster process mapping software available to users across the University of Cambridge.

10:30
Office 2016: Excel, Word and PowerPoint Top Ten Tips (2 of 3) Finished 10:30 - 11:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

Haven't had the time to fully explore all that Excel, Word and PowerPoint has to offer? If so, now's your chance to pick up a few handy tips that you may not have discovered yet. You can save a lot of time and effort working with Excel, Word and PowerPoint if you know a few tricks and shortcuts.

Information Asset Register - Demo and Q&A Event new Finished 10:30 - 11:30 New Museums Site, Babbage Lecture Theatre

The University needs to maintain records about the personal data we hold, how we use it, and how we keep it secure to meet the obligations of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which comes into force on 25 May this year. The Information Asset Register (IAR) is the University’s chosen method of meeting this obligation.

At this event, James Knapton and Sibel Allinson will provide a live demonstration on how to use the IAR and host a Q&A session.

11:30
Office 2016: Excel, Word and PowerPoint Top Ten Tips (3 of 3) Finished 11:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

Haven't had the time to fully explore all that Excel, Word and PowerPoint has to offer? If so, now's your chance to pick up a few handy tips that you may not have discovered yet. You can save a lot of time and effort working with Excel, Word and PowerPoint if you know a few tricks and shortcuts.

13:30
High Performance Computing: An Introduction (2 of 2) Finished 13:30 - 16:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

The course aims to give an introductory overview of High Performance Computing (HPC) in general, and of the facilities of the High Performance Computing Service (HPCS) in particular.

Practical examples of using the HPCS clusters will be used throughout, although it is hoped that much of the content will have applicability to systems elsewhere.

Tuesday 27 March 2018

09:30
Mobile App Building and Augmented Reality: An Introduction new (1 of 2) POSTPONED 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This introduction to building mobile apps explores the basic elements and options for an app, from the simpler menu-driven and webpage rendering approaches, to some of the possibilities involved in orientation and location-sensitive data inputs and augmented reality techniques. The course will include a review of some existing apps which help demonstrate many of the options available for apps, and provide the opportunity to design a basic app incorporating some of those elements. There will also be an overview of important security considerations, and ways to share and distribute a more polished app, either independently or via existing app repositories and stores.

Wednesday 28 March 2018

09:30
Mobile App Building and Augmented Reality: An Introduction new (2 of 2) POSTPONED 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This introduction to building mobile apps explores the basic elements and options for an app, from the simpler menu-driven and webpage rendering approaches, to some of the possibilities involved in orientation and location-sensitive data inputs and augmented reality techniques. The course will include a review of some existing apps which help demonstrate many of the options available for apps, and provide the opportunity to design a basic app incorporating some of those elements. There will also be an overview of important security considerations, and ways to share and distribute a more polished app, either independently or via existing app repositories and stores.

Thursday 12 April 2018

09:00
Programming: Modern Fortran (Workshop) new (1 of 8) Finished 09:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This two day practical hands-on workshop is aimed at Fortran programmers who want to write modern code, or to modernise existing codes, to make it more readable and maintainable by encouraging good software engineering practices. This workshop will also present how to integrate tools and techniques for Fortran codes to help you develop sustainable software for your scientific and academic research particularly in a collaborative environment. Overall, the aim is to make you a better and more productive computational scientist by improving your applied computer science skills that are directly relevant to computational science.

  • Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by completing this form.
Programming: Modern Fortran (Workshop) new (2 of 8) Finished 09:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This two day practical hands-on workshop is aimed at Fortran programmers who want to write modern code, or to modernise existing codes, to make it more readable and maintainable by encouraging good software engineering practices. This workshop will also present how to integrate tools and techniques for Fortran codes to help you develop sustainable software for your scientific and academic research particularly in a collaborative environment. Overall, the aim is to make you a better and more productive computational scientist by improving your applied computer science skills that are directly relevant to computational science.

  • Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by completing this form.
09:30
Introduction to Lean Six Sigma in HE (Equivalent to Yellow Belt Level) new Finished 09:30 - 16:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Huntingdon Room

The course is designed to give participants an overview of Lean six sigma thinking as applied within Higher Education, and an explanation of some of the basic tools used to improve processes.

14:00
Programming: Modern Fortran (Workshop) new (3 of 8) Finished 14:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This two day practical hands-on workshop is aimed at Fortran programmers who want to write modern code, or to modernise existing codes, to make it more readable and maintainable by encouraging good software engineering practices. This workshop will also present how to integrate tools and techniques for Fortran codes to help you develop sustainable software for your scientific and academic research particularly in a collaborative environment. Overall, the aim is to make you a better and more productive computational scientist by improving your applied computer science skills that are directly relevant to computational science.

  • Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by completing this form.
Programming: Modern Fortran (Workshop) new (4 of 8) Finished 14:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This two day practical hands-on workshop is aimed at Fortran programmers who want to write modern code, or to modernise existing codes, to make it more readable and maintainable by encouraging good software engineering practices. This workshop will also present how to integrate tools and techniques for Fortran codes to help you develop sustainable software for your scientific and academic research particularly in a collaborative environment. Overall, the aim is to make you a better and more productive computational scientist by improving your applied computer science skills that are directly relevant to computational science.

  • Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by completing this form.

Friday 13 April 2018

09:00
Programming: Modern Fortran (Workshop) new (5 of 8) Finished 09:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This two day practical hands-on workshop is aimed at Fortran programmers who want to write modern code, or to modernise existing codes, to make it more readable and maintainable by encouraging good software engineering practices. This workshop will also present how to integrate tools and techniques for Fortran codes to help you develop sustainable software for your scientific and academic research particularly in a collaborative environment. Overall, the aim is to make you a better and more productive computational scientist by improving your applied computer science skills that are directly relevant to computational science.

  • Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by completing this form.
Programming: Modern Fortran (Workshop) new (6 of 8) Finished 09:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This two day practical hands-on workshop is aimed at Fortran programmers who want to write modern code, or to modernise existing codes, to make it more readable and maintainable by encouraging good software engineering practices. This workshop will also present how to integrate tools and techniques for Fortran codes to help you develop sustainable software for your scientific and academic research particularly in a collaborative environment. Overall, the aim is to make you a better and more productive computational scientist by improving your applied computer science skills that are directly relevant to computational science.

  • Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by completing this form.
14:00
Programming: Modern Fortran (Workshop) new (7 of 8) Finished 14:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This two day practical hands-on workshop is aimed at Fortran programmers who want to write modern code, or to modernise existing codes, to make it more readable and maintainable by encouraging good software engineering practices. This workshop will also present how to integrate tools and techniques for Fortran codes to help you develop sustainable software for your scientific and academic research particularly in a collaborative environment. Overall, the aim is to make you a better and more productive computational scientist by improving your applied computer science skills that are directly relevant to computational science.

  • Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by completing this form.
Programming: Modern Fortran (Workshop) new (8 of 8) Finished 14:00 - 18:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This two day practical hands-on workshop is aimed at Fortran programmers who want to write modern code, or to modernise existing codes, to make it more readable and maintainable by encouraging good software engineering practices. This workshop will also present how to integrate tools and techniques for Fortran codes to help you develop sustainable software for your scientific and academic research particularly in a collaborative environment. Overall, the aim is to make you a better and more productive computational scientist by improving your applied computer science skills that are directly relevant to computational science.

  • Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by completing this form.

Monday 23 April 2018

09:30
Programming Concepts: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (1 of 4) Finished 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming, or who have never been formally taught the principles and basic concepts of programming. It provides an introduction to the basic concepts common to most high level languages (including Python, Java, Fortran, C, C++, Visual Basic). The aim of the course is to equip attendees with the background knowledge and confidence necessary to tackle many on-line and printed programming tutorials. It may also help attendees in deciding which programming language is suitable for their programming task.

Knowledge of the concepts presented in this course is a pre-requisite for many of the other courses in the Scientific Computing series of courses (although not for the "Python for Absolute Beginners" course).

Programming Concepts: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (2 of 4) Finished 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming, or who have never been formally taught the principles and basic concepts of programming. It provides an introduction to the basic concepts common to most high level languages (including Python, Java, Fortran, C, C++, Visual Basic). The aim of the course is to equip attendees with the background knowledge and confidence necessary to tackle many on-line and printed programming tutorials. It may also help attendees in deciding which programming language is suitable for their programming task.

Knowledge of the concepts presented in this course is a pre-requisite for many of the other courses in the Scientific Computing series of courses (although not for the "Python for Absolute Beginners" course).

Tuesday 24 April 2018

09:30
Adobe Photoshop CC: Introduction (Level 1) (1 of 2) Finished 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Adobe Photoshop CC is the latest version of the favourite image manipulation and editing tool of the professional graphics industry and photographers. It enables digital and scanned-in photographs, pictures and graphics files to be edited and offers a dazzling array of drawing, special effects and filtering tools. Knowing where to start with such a comprehensive and feature-filled package can be daunting. This presentation aims to equip new users with the basics, using live demonstrations throughout.

Programming Concepts: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (3 of 4) Finished 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming, or who have never been formally taught the principles and basic concepts of programming. It provides an introduction to the basic concepts common to most high level languages (including Python, Java, Fortran, C, C++, Visual Basic). The aim of the course is to equip attendees with the background knowledge and confidence necessary to tackle many on-line and printed programming tutorials. It may also help attendees in deciding which programming language is suitable for their programming task.

Knowledge of the concepts presented in this course is a pre-requisite for many of the other courses in the Scientific Computing series of courses (although not for the "Python for Absolute Beginners" course).

Programming Concepts: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (4 of 4) Finished 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming, or who have never been formally taught the principles and basic concepts of programming. It provides an introduction to the basic concepts common to most high level languages (including Python, Java, Fortran, C, C++, Visual Basic). The aim of the course is to equip attendees with the background knowledge and confidence necessary to tackle many on-line and printed programming tutorials. It may also help attendees in deciding which programming language is suitable for their programming task.

Knowledge of the concepts presented in this course is a pre-requisite for many of the other courses in the Scientific Computing series of courses (although not for the "Python for Absolute Beginners" course).

14:00
Adobe Photoshop CC: Introduction (Level 1) (2 of 2) Finished 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

Adobe Photoshop CC is the latest version of the favourite image manipulation and editing tool of the professional graphics industry and photographers. It enables digital and scanned-in photographs, pictures and graphics files to be edited and offers a dazzling array of drawing, special effects and filtering tools. Knowing where to start with such a comprehensive and feature-filled package can be daunting. This presentation aims to equip new users with the basics, using live demonstrations throughout.