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Bioinformatics Training

Bioinformatics course timetable

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Tue 23 Jul – Thu 23 Jan 2020

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July 2019

Fri 26
CRUK: Image Analysis with Fiji [Places] 12:30 - 17:00 eLearning 1 - School of Clinical Medicine

Fiji/ImageJ is a popular open-source image analysis software application. This course will briefly cover introductory aspects of image processing and analysis theory, but will focus on practical sessions where participants will gain hands on experience with Fiji.

This course is run by the CRUK CI Light microscopy core facility.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to Book or register Interest by linking here.

September 2019

Mon 2
Analysis of bulk RNA-seq data (1 of 3) [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

The aim of this course is to familiarize the participants with the primary analysis of RNA-seq data.

This course starts with a brief introduction to RNA-seq and discusses quality control issues. Next, we will present the alignment step, quantification of expression and differential expression analysis. For downstream analysis we will focus on tools available through the Bioconductor project for manipulating and analysing bulk RNA-seq.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Tue 3
Analysis of bulk RNA-seq data (2 of 3) [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

The aim of this course is to familiarize the participants with the primary analysis of RNA-seq data.

This course starts with a brief introduction to RNA-seq and discusses quality control issues. Next, we will present the alignment step, quantification of expression and differential expression analysis. For downstream analysis we will focus on tools available through the Bioconductor project for manipulating and analysing bulk RNA-seq.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Wed 4
Analysis of bulk RNA-seq data (3 of 3) [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

The aim of this course is to familiarize the participants with the primary analysis of RNA-seq data.

This course starts with a brief introduction to RNA-seq and discusses quality control issues. Next, we will present the alignment step, quantification of expression and differential expression analysis. For downstream analysis we will focus on tools available through the Bioconductor project for manipulating and analysing bulk RNA-seq.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Thu 5
An Introduction to Solving Biological Problems with Python (1 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course provides a practical introduction to the writing of Python programs for the complete novice. Participants are lead through the core aspects of Python illustrated by a series of example programs. Upon completion of the course, attentive participants will be able to write simple Python programs and customize more complex code to fit their needs.

Course materials are available here.

Please note that the content of this course has recently been updated. This course now mostly focuses on core concepts including Python syntax, data structures and reading/writing files. Concepts and strategies for working more effectively with Python are now the focus of a new 2-days course, Data Science in Python.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Fri 6
An Introduction to Solving Biological Problems with Python (2 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course provides a practical introduction to the writing of Python programs for the complete novice. Participants are lead through the core aspects of Python illustrated by a series of example programs. Upon completion of the course, attentive participants will be able to write simple Python programs and customize more complex code to fit their needs.

Course materials are available here.

Please note that the content of this course has recently been updated. This course now mostly focuses on core concepts including Python syntax, data structures and reading/writing files. Concepts and strategies for working more effectively with Python are now the focus of a new 2-days course, Data Science in Python.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Mon 9
Introduction to R for Biologists (1 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

R is one of the leading programming languages in Data Science. It is widely used to perform statistics, machine learning, visualisations and data analyses. It is an open source programming language so all the software we will use in the course is free. This course is an introduction to R designed for participants with no programming experience. We will start from scratch by introducing how to start programming in R and progress our way and learn how to read and write to files, manipulate data and visualise it by creating different plots - all the fundamental tasks you need to get you started analysing your data. During the course we will be working with one of the most popular packages in R; tidyverse that will allow you to manipulate your data effectively and visualise it to a publication level standard.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Tue 10
Introduction to R for Biologists (2 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

R is one of the leading programming languages in Data Science. It is widely used to perform statistics, machine learning, visualisations and data analyses. It is an open source programming language so all the software we will use in the course is free. This course is an introduction to R designed for participants with no programming experience. We will start from scratch by introducing how to start programming in R and progress our way and learn how to read and write to files, manipulate data and visualise it by creating different plots - all the fundamental tasks you need to get you started analysing your data. During the course we will be working with one of the most popular packages in R; tidyverse that will allow you to manipulate your data effectively and visualise it to a publication level standard.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Thu 19
Statistics for Biologists in R (1 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course is intended to provide a strong foundation in practical statistics and data analysis using the R software environment. The underlying philosophy of the course is to treat statistics as a practical skill rather than as a theoretical subject and as such the course focuses on methods for addressing real-life issues in the biological sciences using the R software package.

In this course we explore classical statistical analysis techniques starting with simple hypothesis testing and building up to multiple linear regression. The focus of the course is on practical implementation of these techniques and developing robust statistical analysis skills rather than on the underlying statistical theory.

After the course you should feel confident to be able to select and implement common statistical techniques using R and moreover know when, and when not, to apply these techniques.

This event is supported by the BBSRC Strategic Training Awards for Research Skills (STARS) grant (BB/P022766/1).

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Fri 20
Statistics for Biologists in R (2 of 2) [Full] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course is intended to provide a strong foundation in practical statistics and data analysis using the R software environment. The underlying philosophy of the course is to treat statistics as a practical skill rather than as a theoretical subject and as such the course focuses on methods for addressing real-life issues in the biological sciences using the R software package.

In this course we explore classical statistical analysis techniques starting with simple hypothesis testing and building up to multiple linear regression. The focus of the course is on practical implementation of these techniques and developing robust statistical analysis skills rather than on the underlying statistical theory.

After the course you should feel confident to be able to select and implement common statistical techniques using R and moreover know when, and when not, to apply these techniques.

This event is supported by the BBSRC Strategic Training Awards for Research Skills (STARS) grant (BB/P022766/1).

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

October 2019

Wed 2
An Introduction to Machine Learning (1 of 3) [Full] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

Machine learning gives computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed. It encompasses a broad range of approaches to data analysis with applicability across the biological sciences. Lectures will introduce commonly used algorithms and provide insight into their theoretical underpinnings. In the practicals students will apply these algorithms to real biological data-sets using the R language and environment.

Please be aware that the course syllabus is currently being updated following feedback from the last event; therefore the agenda below will be subjected to changes.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Thu 3
An Introduction to Machine Learning (2 of 3) [Full] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

Machine learning gives computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed. It encompasses a broad range of approaches to data analysis with applicability across the biological sciences. Lectures will introduce commonly used algorithms and provide insight into their theoretical underpinnings. In the practicals students will apply these algorithms to real biological data-sets using the R language and environment.

Please be aware that the course syllabus is currently being updated following feedback from the last event; therefore the agenda below will be subjected to changes.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Fri 4
An Introduction to Machine Learning (3 of 3) [Full] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

Machine learning gives computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed. It encompasses a broad range of approaches to data analysis with applicability across the biological sciences. Lectures will introduce commonly used algorithms and provide insight into their theoretical underpinnings. In the practicals students will apply these algorithms to real biological data-sets using the R language and environment.

Please be aware that the course syllabus is currently being updated following feedback from the last event; therefore the agenda below will be subjected to changes.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Fri 11
Introduction to Scientific Figure Design [Places] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course provides a practical guide to producing figures for use in reports and publications.

It is a wide ranging course which looks at how to design figures to clearly and fairly represent your data, the practical aspects of graph creation, the allowable manipulation of bitmap images and compositing and editing of final figures.

The course will use a number of different open source software packages and is illustrated with a number of example figures adapted from common analysis tools.

Further information and access to the course materials is here.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no level access.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Thu 17
Open Targets: Integrating genetics and genomics for disease biology and translational medicine [Places] 13:00 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

Open Targets is a public-private partnership to use human genetics, genomic data and drug information for systematic identification and prioritisation of therapeutic targets. This module introduces the Open Targets partnership, its underlying projects and the bioinformatics resources for researchers studying associations of human genes with diseases.

We offer interactive and hands-on experience with Open Targets Platform and Open Targets Genetics, open source tools of integrated biological and chemical data for drug target identification and prioritisation. We cover user cases relevant to the biomedical and pharmaceutical communities and can customise the course according to specific therapeutic areas.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Wed 23
ChIP-seq and ATAC-seq analysis (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

The primary aim of this course is to familiarise participants with the analysis of ChIP-seq and ATAC-seq data and provide hands-on training on the latest analytical approaches.

The course starts with an introduction to ChIP-seq experiments for the detection of genome-wide DNA binding sites of transcription factors and other proteins. We first show data quality control and basic analytical steps such as alignment, peak calling and motif analysis, followed by practical examples on how to work with biological replicates and fundamental quality metrics for ChIP-seq datasets. On the second day, we then focus on the analysis of differential binding, comparing between different samples. We will also give an introduction to ATAC-seq data analysis for the detection of regions of open chromatin.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Thu 24
ChIP-seq and ATAC-seq analysis (2 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 17:00 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

The primary aim of this course is to familiarise participants with the analysis of ChIP-seq and ATAC-seq data and provide hands-on training on the latest analytical approaches.

The course starts with an introduction to ChIP-seq experiments for the detection of genome-wide DNA binding sites of transcription factors and other proteins. We first show data quality control and basic analytical steps such as alignment, peak calling and motif analysis, followed by practical examples on how to work with biological replicates and fundamental quality metrics for ChIP-seq datasets. On the second day, we then focus on the analysis of differential binding, comparing between different samples. We will also give an introduction to ATAC-seq data analysis for the detection of regions of open chromatin.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

Wed 30
Data Science in Python (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 16:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course covers concepts and strategies for working more effectively with Python with the aim of writing reusable code, using function and libraries. Participants will acquire a working knowledge of key concepts which are prerequisites for advanced programming in Python e.g. writing modules and classes.

Note: this course is the continuation of the Introduction to Solving Biological Problems with Python; participants are expected to have attended the introductory Python course and/or have acquired some working knowledge of Python. This course is also open to Python beginners who are already fluent in other programming languages as this will help them to quickly get started in Python.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Thu 31
Data Science in Python (2 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 16:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course covers concepts and strategies for working more effectively with Python with the aim of writing reusable code, using function and libraries. Participants will acquire a working knowledge of key concepts which are prerequisites for advanced programming in Python e.g. writing modules and classes.

Note: this course is the continuation of the Introduction to Solving Biological Problems with Python; participants are expected to have attended the introductory Python course and/or have acquired some working knowledge of Python. This course is also open to Python beginners who are already fluent in other programming languages as this will help them to quickly get started in Python.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

November 2019

Wed 20
Analysis of DNA Methylation using Sequencing [Places] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

This course will cover all aspects of the analysis of DNA methylation using sequencing, including primary analysis, mapping and quality control of BS-Seq data, common pitfalls and complications.

It will also include exploratory analysis of methylation, looking at different methods of quantitation, and a variety of ways of looking more widely at the distribution of methylation over the genome. Finally the course will look at statistical methods to predict differential methylation.

The course will be comprised of a mixture of theoretical lectures and practicals covering a range of different software packages.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no level access.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book by linking here.

Wed 27
Using the Ensembl Genome Browser [Places] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

The Ensembl Project provides a comprehensive and integrated source of annotation of, mainly vertebrate, genome sequences. This workshop offers a comprehensive practical introduction to the use of the Ensembl genome browser as well as essential background information.

This course will focus on the vertebrate genomes in Ensembl, however much of what will be covered is also applicable to the non-vertebrates (plants, bacteria, fungi, metazoa and protists) in Ensembl Genomes.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.

January 2020

Thu 23
Extracting biological information from gene lists [Places] 09:30 - 17:30 Bioinformatics Training Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

Many experimental designs end up producing lists of hits, usually based around genes or transcripts. Sometimes these lists are small enough that they can be examined individually, but often it is useful to do a more structured functional analysis to try to automatically determine any interesting biological themes which turn up in the lists.

This course looks at the various software packages, databases and statistical methods which may be of use in performing such an analysis. As well as being a practical guide to performing these types of analysis the course will also look at the types of artefacts and bias which can lead to false conclusions about functionality and will look at the appropriate ways to both run the analysis and present the results for publication.

Course materials are available here.

The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level.

Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge Raven account you will need to book or register your interest by linking here.