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Office of Scholarly Communication course timetable

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Sat 23 Mar – Wed 17 Jul

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March 2019

Mon 25

FAIR data are those that are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. Sounds simple enough, but what do each of these terms mean in a practical sense and how can you tell if your own research data is FAIR?

The Research Data Team at the Office of Scholarly Communication join forces with FOSTER Open Science to offer a practical workshop to help you get to grips with the key principles and consider how you can start to make your own data FAIRer.

Once you have completed How FAIR is your research data? An online course (for researchers and postgraduate students in all disciplines) we invite you to attend this workshop session with the Research Data Team from the Office of Scholarly Communication to discuss your experiences in assessing the FAIRness of your data, including any problems you encountered. You are welcome to bring examples of your data to this session to further develop your skills, or try your hand at FAIRifying more example datasets from Apollo.

FAIR data are those that are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. Sounds simple enough, but what do each of these terms mean in a practical sense and how can your researchers tell if their research data is FAIR?

The Research Data Team at the Office of Scholarly Communication join forces with FOSTER Open Science to offer this workshop to help you get to grips with the key principles and consider how you can help your researchers make their data FAIRer.

Once you have completed How FAIR is that research data?: an online course (for research support staff including librarians and administrators in all disciplines) we invite you to attend this workshop session with the Research Data Team from the Office of Scholarly Communication to discuss your experiences in assessing the FAIRness of your data, including any problems you encountered. We will also discuss guidelines on how to best support researchers in making their data FAIR.

April 2019

Thu 4

Advertised on behalf of ReproducibiliTea, the Open Science Journal Club in the Department of Psychology

The Open Science Journal Club invites anyone interested in Open Research to join this lunchtime session, where Dav Clark will introduce Gigantum, a free open source tool designed to streamline reproducible and collaborative data science. Gigantum aims to bring together complex tools, workflows and community approaches that enable exciting research collaborations and also enable others to evaluate and build on your work.

The session will introduce the Gigantum Client, an MIT licensed web application that runs locally, simplifying and automating tools like Docker, Git, and launching environments like JupyterLab. Dav will also describe paid services hosted by Gigantum that enable single-click publication and collaboration from the Client. You will learn about versioning and collaboration features, how to easily move work between local resources and the cloud, as well as new approaches to creating and managing scientific datasets. There will also be the chance to go under the hood to show how sophisticated users (e.g., Research Software Engineers, Data Librarians, etc.) can create customized data science environments that are easy to distribute, and are accessible to users with diverse skill sets.

All welcome - if you aren't a member of the Department of Psychology, please meet at the Department Reception by 12.55 and Ben Farrar will show you to the Nick Macintosh Seminar Room (a second escort will check at 1pm for latecomers!).

This session will include a hands-on demo, so please bring your laptops. You may bring your lunch if you wish, and Dav is happy to join participants for lunch afterwards.

Wed 17
With Great Power Comes the Responsible Use of Metrics (for librarians) new [Places] 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

Do metrics really add up?

Metrics have long been used as an indicator of academic success and as a way to make key decisions. As the measurement of impact becomes increasingly important within academia there has been something of a backlash against trusting purely quantitative methods of assessment. The Responsible Metrics movement aims to ensure that metrics are used fairly alongside other measures to gather a true assessment of impact.

This webinar will discuss what the Responsible Metrics movement is, why it was developed, its importance and how library staff can best educate their research staff.

Tue 30
  • Would you like to share your research findings with the international academic community, and use open materials from other researchers, without paywall restrictions?
  • Would you like to boost citations of your work and increase collaboration?
  • Did you know that funders recognise the benefits of Open Access and most now require it as a condition of their grants?

These are questions for postgraduate students at all stages of their research.

Research in the 21st century is changing at a rapid pace and it can be hard to keep up with this dynamic and fast-paced environment. There are more pressures on researchers than ever before, including mandates around Open Access and data sharing as well as extra pressure to boost citations to secure the next role.

The University of Cambridge has recently committed to promoting and supporting Open Research, and understanding the basics of 'what it is' is now essential for researchers. This introductory session will help you navigate this complex minefield including the benefits of Open Access, how to use the University’s repository to publish research and boost your citations, and how to comply with the new regulations.

May 2019

Tue 7

PREVENT RESEARCH DISASTERS THROUGH GOOD DATA MANAGEMENT

  • How much information would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research information?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from measurements, numbers and images to documents and publications.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

Thu 9
Getting started with peer review (for early career researchers and third and fourth year PhD students) new [Places] 14:00 - 16:30 Postdoc Centre @ Biomedical Campus, Newman Library

If you have recently started peer reviewing, or are ready to get involved, this is an unmissable chance to pick up tips and best practices from PLOS, publishers of the world's largest multi-disciplinary peer-reviewed journal.

The Office of Scholarly Communication invites you to join PLOS for an essential introduction to Peer Review.

You'll learn...

  • the 3 questions you should always ask yourself when you're asked to do a review
  • how to get ready to review and be recognized for your work
  • how to read a manuscript with peer review in mind
  • how to write the feedback you wish you'd received.

Stay on after the workshop to chat to PLOS staff and editors and enjoy light refreshments.

Tue 14
  • Where should you publish your research?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a journal for your work?
  • How do you respond to reviewers?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Indicators to use to assess a journal - Journal Impact Factor, publisher fees and publication times
  • Who should own the copyright to your work?
  • What happens during peer-review
Wed 15
So Many Shades of Grey: Using Your Judgement to Answer Copyright Queries (for librarians) new [Places] 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

Nothing with copyright is ever simple, so how do you know where to start?

From the fair dealing to sharing your research online, it seems that nothing with copyright is ever simple. There are few black and white rules about copyright but there are consequences for getting something wrong!

This webinar will cover some of the most common grey areas in copyright such as fair dealing and expiry dates and offer librarians some strategies to make decisions and help advise their research community on copyright issues.

Tue 21
  • Where should you publish your monograph or book chapter?
  • How do you assess the appropriateness of a publisher for your work?

Picking where to publish your research and in what format is an important decision to make.

This session looks at the things you need to consider in order to reach your audience effectively, including:

  • Turning your thesis into a monograph
  • Choosing a publisher
  • Understanding the publication process
Tue 28
Copyright: a survival guide (for PhD students in Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences) [Places] 11:00 - 12:00 Sidgwick Site, Alison Richard Building, SG1

Confused by copyright? You are not alone!

Copyright involves much more than checking how much you are photocopying, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Join the Office of Scholarly Communication as we answer your copyright queries, looking at:

  • Copyright transfer agreements
  • Creative Commons
  • 3rd party copyright
  • Open Access publisher requirements

The session will start with a 40 minute presentation, after which the time is open for you to raise questions and discuss issues you have encountered.

June 2019

Tue 4

You've published your research...now what should you do with it?

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics:

  • Scholarly best practice for sharing research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media
  • Benefits that sharing your research brings you and the wider community
  • What your funder expects you to share.
  • How to use the University repository, Apollo, to share your research and also access that of others
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research
Tue 11

If you have recently started receiving peer reviews, or would like to become a reviewer, this is an unmissable chance to pick up tips and best practices for responding to reviews, being noticed as a reviewer, getting your review done, and getting credit for your work

The Office of Scholarly Communication invites you to an essential introduction to Peer Review.

You'll learn...

  • how to make the most of the peer review process
  • how to increase the chance of being asked to review
  • how to get ready to review and be recognized for your work
  • how to write the feedback you wish you'd received.
Wed 19
Mirror, Mirror: the Growth of Mirror Journals (for librarians) new [Places] 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

Solving the problem of Open Access or causing more trouble?

Open Access can be hard to understand at the best of times but one term that causes particular confusion is ‘mirror journals’. Promoted as one way of solving the problem of a lack of publisher interest in Open Access, these titles are appearing in every discipline but what are they?

Join the OSC for this information webinar to find out all about mirror journals, their history, the problems they can solve and those that they can potentially cause!

July 2019

Wed 17
Open Access Update 2019 (for librarians) new [Places] 12:00 - 13:00 Office of Scholarly Communication Online Webinar

What’s new in Open Access for 2019?

Open Access is a fast moving area but it can be hard to find time to keep up with the latest developments. This session offers a brief update on the biggest changes both within Cambridge and the wider world in the last year.