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Seeing your name on the spine of a book is a great achievement, which can help to kick start your career in some disciplines. How do you get there?

This session answers some of the key questions along the way, including including:

  • Should you turn your thesis into a monograph?
  • How do you choose a publisher?
  • How do you get your proposal accepted?
  • What are the key stages in the publication process?

Confused by copyright? You are not alone!

Copyright involves much more than checking how much you are photocopying, but it can be difficult to know where to start.

Join the Office of Scholarly Communication as we answer your copyright queries, looking at:

  • Who owns the copyright to my published articles?
  • How can I use Creative Commons Licenses to make my work available to all?
  • How can I safely reuse other's work?
  • What do my publishers and funders require of me?

FAIR data are those that are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. Sounds simple enough, but what do each of these terms mean in a practical sense and how can your researchers tell if their research data is FAIR?

The Research Data Team at the Office of Scholarly Communication join forces with FOSTER Open Science to offer this practical course to help you get to grips with the key principles and consider how you can help your researchers make their data FAIRer.

Course commences Monday 4 March: book your place by Thursday 28 February.

This three-week, self-paced course will:

  • introduce you to the key terms and explain what they mean in a practical sense
  • demonstrate how data management planning can help to make data FAIR from the very start of research projects
  • show you how you can use freely available tools to help assess the FAIRness of data
  • provide you with the chance to FAIRify a sample dataset from the Apollo repository, and get feedback from your peers on its potential reusabilty.

The course consists of an online module followed by two short exercises (see below for details). During this time, participants will need to allocate between 2-4 hours to complete all of the course tasks. Upon successful completion of the course, participants will be awarded with a 'FAIR Data Assessor' badge.

You are then invited to attend a workshop on Monday 25 March with teams from FOSTER Open Science and the Office of Scholarly Communication to discuss your experiences in assessing the FAIRness of your chosen dataset, including any problems you encountered. We will also discuss guidelines on how to best support researchers in making their data FAIR. Find further details here about How FAIR is that research data?: a workshop (for research support staff including librarians and administrators in all disciplines).

The course is open to any staff involved in supporting researchers.

FAIR data are those that are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. Sounds simple enough, but what do each of these terms mean in a practical sense and how can you tell if your own research data is FAIR?

The Research Data Team at the Office of Scholarly Communication join forces with FOSTER Open Science to offer this practical course to help you get to grips with the key principles and consider how you can start to make your own data FAIRer.

Course commences Monday 4 March: book your place by Thursday 28 February.

This three-week, self-paced course will:

  • introduce you to the key terms and explain what they mean in a practical sense
  • demonstrate how data management planning can help to make data FAIR from the very start of research projects
  • show you how you can use freely available tools to help assess the FAIRness of data
  • provide you with the chance to FAIRify your own data, or a sample dataset from the Apollo repository, and get feedback from your peers on its potential reusabilty.

The course consists of an online module followed by two short exercises (see below for details). During this time, participants will need to allocate between 2-4 hours to complete all of the course tasks. Upon successful completion of the course, participants will be awarded with a 'FAIR Data Assessor' badge.

You are then invited to attend a workshop on Monday 25 March with FOSTER and the Research Data Team from the Office of Scholarly Communication to discuss your experiences in assessing the FAIRness of your data, including any problems you encountered. You are welcome to bring examples of your data to this session to further develop your skills, or try your hand at FAIRifying more example datasets from Apollo. Find further details here about How FAIR is your research data?: a workshop (for researchers and postgraduate students in all disciplines).

The course is open to researchers and postgraduate students in all disciplines - arts, humanities and social sciences as well as sciences, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine.

Journal article versions new Self-taught Bookable

Where and how can you share your articles? Each article goes through different versions, from submitted manuscript, through accepted manuscript, proof, and finally version of record. Often the text is very similar, but subtle differences mean that one version can be legally shared and another cannot. In this course, you will learn how to identify article versions and apply the correct terminology.

Publishing journal articles is a key element of a successful research career. As you are starting on this journey, you may have a lot of questions, for example:

  • Where and how should I publish my research?
  • How do I maximise the number of readers and citations?
  • How should I respond to reviewers?

We want to hear YOUR views on research. Who owns your work? Who should access it? How does your research compare to other disciplines?

Come along for a free lunch and to discuss how the University can support you in practicing Open Research. Learn about the requirements placed on researchers and the tools you could use to boost your impact. Find out what your peers think and contribute to shaping a University-wide strategy for Open Research training.

3 other events...

Date Availability
Mon 4 Nov 2019 12:30 [Places]
Tue 19 Nov 2019 12:30 [Places]
Mon 25 Nov 2019 12:00 [Places]

Prevent research disasters through good data management

  • How much information would you lose if your laptop was stolen?
  • Have you ever emailed your colleague a file named 'final_final_versionEDITED'?
  • Do you know what your funder expects you to do with your research information?

As a researcher, you will encounter research data in many forms, ranging from literature sources, interviews, measurements, numbers and images.

Whether you create, receive or collect this information, you will need to organise it.

Managing digital information properly is a complex issue. Doing it correctly from the start could save you a lot of time and hassle when preparing a publication or writing up your thesis.

The principles of Plan S are set to change what funders require from researchers, placing a much greater emphasis on immediate Open Access and other open practices. While we've been busy preparing here in the UK, our colleagues in the US have not been idle.

Micah Vandegrift is the Open Knowledge Librarian at NC State University Libraries, where he works on community-building and advocating for Open Research. He will be sharing his perspective on the likely impact of Plan S on libraries, publishers, researchers and repositories.

Following a 20-30 minutes talk, there will be an opportunity to discuss these issues with others in the room.

If you would like to refresh your knowledge of Plan S before the seminar, check out our Plan S Factsheet (https://osc.cam.ac.uk/files/copy_of_plan_s.pdf) or webinar (https://osc.cam.ac.uk/training/supporting-researchers-21st-century-programme/wednesday-webinars).

You've published your research...now what should you do with it? It seems we are expected to share more and more online, which can be both daunting and exciting. In this session we will look carefully at the benefits and barriers to sharing research, giving you an opportunity to consider a strategy that will work for you.

This session explores the whys and hows of sharing research - the options, the benefits and the logistics:

  • Your aims and motivations for disseminating research
  • Opportunities for sharing offered by social media and traditional media
  • Pitfalls when creating an online presence
  • Ways to find out who has been sharing, using and citing your published research

This course covers the practical steps you need to take in order to ensure that work submitted for publication by University of Cambridge researchers is compliant for REF2021.

We will introduce the principles of open access and open research, and guide you through the necessary steps to meet the open access requirements of REF2021. We will demonstrate key processes for uploading work to Symplectic, including choosing the right version of a work to upload. There will be plenty of time in the session to ask questions.

This course will be useful to you if you:

  • administer the uploading of research outputs to Symplectic Elements to make them open access
  • manage Symplectic profiles
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