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Cambridge University Libraries course timetable

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Fri 18 Jan – Tue 12 Feb

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Monday 21 January

11:00

Referencing where you got ideas and inspiration from for your research is a core skill for any good researcher. In this session, you will learn about the University of Cambridge's approach to plagiarism, as well as giving tips and tricks on how to avoid being caught out through bad referencing techniques. You will also be shown handy tools that can do a lot of the work for you as well as managing your literature reading list throughout your work and beyond.

Bring along your laptop, tablet or mobile phone to join in with our interactive referencing quiz and put your knowledge to the test! You might even win a prize!

14:00
Medicine: Getting the best results - improving your database searching (for NHS staff only) new [Places] 14:00 - 16:00 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

A course specifically for NHS staff. Attendees will learn how to search databases accessed with an Athens login (such as Medline, Embase and Cinahl) effectively and efficiently, to learn how to save searches and references, and to create and maintain a bibliography.

All attendees are required to have an NHS Athens login.

14:30
'Yes You Do Need To Reference That': a Crash Course in Being an Ethical Researcher [Places] 14:30 - 15:30 Department of Physics, Rutherford Seminar Room

Referencing where you got ideas and inspiration from for your research is a core skill for any good researcher. In this session, you will learn about the University of Cambridge's approach to plagiarism, as well as giving tips and tricks on how to avoid being caught out through bad referencing techniques. You will also be shown handy tools that can do a lot of the work for you as well as managing your literature reading list throughout your work and beyond.

Bring along your laptop, tablet or mobile phone to join in with our interactive referencing quiz and put your knowledge to the test! You might even win a prize!

Tuesday 22 January

13:00
Do You Really Own Your Research? Copyright, Collaboration, and Creative Commons [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Pink Study Room

You own your own research right? Well it depends. In this session we will explore the sometimes very complicated world of copyright and what can happen when you publish your work. We'll also introduce you to concepts such as third party copyright, and how you can use existing licencing tools to maximise the reach of your research as well as using other peoples work to advance your own, but legally.

If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

14:00
Medicine: Critical Appraisal - Systematic Reviews (for University and NHS) [Standby] 14:00 - 15:30 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

This course will help you understand how to critically appraise a systematic review, assessing its reliability, trustworthiness, and applicability.

We ask that you read a paper that will be provided before you attend the session, in order for us to make the best use of the time together.

Wednesday 23 January

10:00
Medicine: Managing Your Bibliography (for University and NHS) [Places] 10:00 - 12:00 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

How to take the bile out of your bibliography, and ensure that it's not the most time-consuming part of your work. A variety of tools will be showcased: EndNote, EndNoteWeb, Zotero, Mendeley.

Finding Secondary Literature [Places] 10:00 - 11:00 Faculty of English, GR05

Finding secondary literature to inform and support your research is paramount to any higher-level research. This session focuses on the concepts as well as practical issues, to give participants a more comprehensive understanding of the issues and features of literature searching.

Please bring your own wifi-connected device, so that you can look at some of the platforms.

13:30
Newspapers, past and current new [Full] 13:30 - 14:30 Sidgwick Site, Alison Richard Building, S1

This session will cover how to find and access current newspapers, including registering for the FT.com. The second part of the session will cover how to access and search newspaper archives and how to get the best from these resources.

Thursday 24 January

11:00
Do You Really Own Your Research? Copyright, Collaboration, and Creative Commons [Places] 11:00 - 12:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 10

You own your own research right? Well it depends. In this session we will explore the sometimes very complicated world of copyright and what can happen when you publish your work. We'll also introduce you to concepts such as third party copyright, and how you can use existing licencing tools to maximise the reach of your research as well as using other peoples work to advance your own, but legally.

Friday 25 January

09:00
iDiscover: Drop-in Surgery new Not bookable 09:00 - 10:15 Cambridge University Library: General Enquiries Helpdesk (Main landing above the Entrance Hall)

Need help with iDiscover? Call in at the General Enquiries Helpdesk (on the landing above the Entrance Hall) where a member of Library staff will be able to help you search our print and online collections, answer any questions you have, or give you a general overview.

Every Friday between 9.00 and 10.15.

10:00
Medicine: Research Data Management (for University and NHS) [Places] 10:00 - 11:30 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

There is an increasing emphasis in research on the management and sharing of data. Many funding bodies that support research undertaken at Cambridge require not only open access to any publications based on that research, but also to the data underlying it. This course will help you understand funders’ requirements for management and sharing of research data, and will provide opportunities to create your own data management plan and test out resources that will make the data management process easier.

Monday 28 January

14:00
Making Your Research Impactful [Places] 14:00 - 15:30 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 10

This session explores why you should share your all research as widely as possible and how you can go about doing so. It will demonstrate the potential that Open Research can have in maximising exposure for your work and how you can track and trace how your research is being shared online.

Please bring your own internet-enabled device to this session.

Tuesday 29 January

13:00
Working Openly and Reproducibly - Developing Research Skills For the Future [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Pink Study Room

This session will introduce participants to the ideas of working openly and reproducibly through presenting case studies and tools to help facilitate this kind of work. From GitHub to good file naming conventions, participants will be given the opportunity to learn from other people’s failures and to be better at future-proofing their research.

If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

Thursday 31 January

12:00
Showcasing Tools and Resources for Graduates (STEM) new [Places] 12:00 - 14:00 Clinical School, E-learning 1, 2, 3 (Level 2)

This event will allow participants to explore lots of different tools and resources that can help them with their work at Cambridge.

Tools and resources on offer include:

  • streamlining academic work (IFTTT, LaTeX, Overleaf, alerts)
  • managing academic outputs (ORCiD, Apollo, Symplectic Elements, Metrics)
  • industry and the world of work (LinkedIn & advice from the Careers Service)

Participants will be able to rotate between different areas to hear short presentations (15 mins) and explore tools that they want to know more about. Handouts on all the tools and resources on offer will be available. The event will be led by librarians from across the Cambridge University Libraries community.

Participants can drop in to the event at any convenient time but we do encourage you to book so we can have an idea of numbers. All are welcome but this event will have a particular relevance for STEM graduate students and researchers.

You do not have to stay for the full event duration.

Refreshments will be available on a first come, first served basis. Support for this event has been provided by the Researcher Development Programme.

Friday 1 February

09:00
iDiscover: Drop-in Surgery new Not bookable 09:00 - 10:15 Cambridge University Library: General Enquiries Helpdesk (Main landing above the Entrance Hall)

Need help with iDiscover? Call in at the General Enquiries Helpdesk (on the landing above the Entrance Hall) where a member of Library staff will be able to help you search our print and online collections, answer any questions you have, or give you a general overview.

Every Friday between 9.00 and 10.15.

Monday 4 February

11:00
Effective Strategies For Managing Your Research Data (Beginners' Session) [Places] 11:00 - 13:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 10

What would happen to your research data if your lab exploded, or your laptop was stolen, or your cloud storage account was hacked? How could you prevent data loss in these situations? Managing your data effectively is vital to help you do this.

This workshop will introduce the basic principles of Research Data Management (RDM) and how they are relevant throughout the research life cycle.

Intended for those who are new to RDM, this course will firstly explain what RDM is, and then go on to cover basic data back-up and storage options, file sharing tools, and strategies for organising your data, as well as providing guidance on managing personal or sensitive data. You will also learn about the range of support services available to you within the University for managing your data.

If you already have a basic understanding of RDM then the advanced course is probably more appropriate for you to attend.

Tuesday 5 February

10:00
Medicine: Critical Appraisal - RCT Drug Trials (for University and NHS) new [Places] 10:00 - 11:30 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

This course will help you understand how to critically appraise a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT). Using the CASP Checklist, the course covers samples and sample size, randomisation, bias, statistics, significance (P Values and Confidence Intervals) and relevance.

We ask that you read a paper that will be provided before you attend the session, in order for us to make the best use of the time together.

13:00
Who Can You Really Trust In Science? [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Pink Study Room

There are lots of "experts" out there in science but how do you know who you can trust and who should be taken with a pinch of salt?

This session will enable participants to develop critical evaluation skills around trustworthiness in scientific disciplines by evaluating different indicators of perceived quality such as seniority, funding, publishing records and even celebrity status. Participants will work through anonymised case studies in groups as well as being introduced to concepts such as publishing, open science and reproducibility, fake news, and effective science communication.

If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

Wednesday 6 February

10:00

One session - four medicine and life science databases - widest coverage for your literature search. PubMed is great, but it doesn't cover all the journals relevant to life sciences and medicine. Embase, Web of Science and Scopus can also be relevant and each covers unique material. Come to this hands-on session to learn how to get the best from each of these "4 tops".

Working with Digital Manuscripts new (1 of 2) [Places] 10:00 - 12:00 Cambridge University Library, IT Training Room

Session 1: Introduction to working with digital manuscripts This workshop will introduce you to digital manuscripts by exploring how and where to find them, what to expect when you do, understanding digital manuscript resources and what you can do with them.

Session 2: Tools for working with digitised manuscripts This workshop will introduce you to some of the tools that can be used when working with digital manuscripts. We will also explore further ideas and tools in addition to some other sources for assistance and further learning opportunities.

Thursday 7 February

11:00
Effective Strategies For Managing Your Research Data (Advanced Session) [Places] 11:00 - 13:00 8 Mill Lane, Lecture Room 10

If you already know the basics of Research Data Management (RDM) – for example backing up your work, file storage options - but now need to know more about effective strategies for sharing your data, then this course is for you!

This course gives a brief recap on RDM and then covers managing personal and sensitive data in the context of the new GDPR legislation, why it is a Good Thing to share your data, and how to do this most effectively in terms of describing your data, deciding where to share it, and using licences to control how your data is used by others. You will even get to write your own Data Management Plan (DMP): these help you manage your data throughout a project and after it has ended and are increasingly required as part of a grant or fellowship application. You will also learn about the range of support services available to you within the University for managing your data.

If you are completely new to the concept of research data management then the beginners course is for you.

Friday 8 February

09:00
iDiscover: Drop-in Surgery new Not bookable 09:00 - 10:15 Cambridge University Library: General Enquiries Helpdesk (Main landing above the Entrance Hall)

Need help with iDiscover? Call in at the General Enquiries Helpdesk (on the landing above the Entrance Hall) where a member of Library staff will be able to help you search our print and online collections, answer any questions you have, or give you a general overview.

Every Friday between 9.00 and 10.15.

12:00
Medicine: Writing for Publication (for University and NHS) [Places] 12:00 - 13:00 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

A course designed to take you step-by-step through academic writing and publication, with tips and resources to make writing up as simple as possible. The course will demystify the peer-review process, and help you to improve the precision and clarity of your academic writing.

Monday 11 February

10:00
How To Nail Your Literature Review 1: Finding What You Need [Places] 10:00 - 11:00 Department of Physics, Rutherford Seminar Room

This session will help prepare you to begin your literature review. You will learn strategies for searching for relevant material, how to troubleshoot common search problems, and how to stay up to date with new publications in your field.

Please bring a laptop, tablet or other web-enabled device with you to the session.

Tuesday 12 February

13:00
How To Prepare A Polished Conference Poster new [Places] 13:00 - 14:00 Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Betty and Gordon Moore Library, Pink Study Room

Need to create a conference poster but are not sure where to start? This session will introduce participants to the fundamentals of designing an effective and engaging poster that is perfect for communicating research ideas. The session will look at good design practice, where to source free high quality graphics, as well as deciding what you should (and maybe shouldn't) include in your final poster.

If this session is fully booked please join the waiting list - we will move venues if there is demand.

14:00
Medicine: Systematic Literature Reviews - A 'How To' Guide (for University and NHS) [Places] 14:00 - 16:00 Clinical School, Medical Library, Library Training Room

Before undertaking any piece of primary research it’s important to be aware of as much of the existing literature as possible. A systematic literature review can also be a research end in itself. And it’s not something to be taken lightly. But how can you be sure you’re being as rigorous as necessary? How can you manage the references you find, document the process, and also know when to stop searching?