skip to navigation skip to content

University Information Services course timetable

Show:

Sun 17 Dec – Thu 25 Jan 2018

Now Today

[ No events today ]

Wednesday 3 January 2018

14:00
C++: Programming in Modern C++ (1 of 6) [Full] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This is an introduction to programming in modern C++, based on the book "'Programming: Principles and Practice using C++"' (2nd ed.) by Bjarne Stroustrup. The aim is to teach participants how to write non trivial, practical programs that are comprehensible and portable. Participants should also be able to understand and modify most well-written C++ applications, though not necessarily every aspect of them.

C++ is a large and complicated language, which is reflected in the length of this course. The creator of C++, Prof. Stroustrup, estimates that newcomers to programming will have to devote in excess of 200 hours' of work to learn how to program in C++ properly. Please bear that in mind if signing up for the course. It would also be of help (though not essential) if attendees have some prior programming experience in another language, e.g. Python.

Wednesday 10 January 2018

10:30
Drupal: An Introduction (Department of Computer Science and Technology) [Places] 10:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 2

This course will cover the most essential features and concepts of Drupal Content Management Service through hands on activities.

14:00
C++: Programming in Modern C++ (2 of 6) [Full] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This is an introduction to programming in modern C++, based on the book "'Programming: Principles and Practice using C++"' (2nd ed.) by Bjarne Stroustrup. The aim is to teach participants how to write non trivial, practical programs that are comprehensible and portable. Participants should also be able to understand and modify most well-written C++ applications, though not necessarily every aspect of them.

C++ is a large and complicated language, which is reflected in the length of this course. The creator of C++, Prof. Stroustrup, estimates that newcomers to programming will have to devote in excess of 200 hours' of work to learn how to program in C++ properly. Please bear that in mind if signing up for the course. It would also be of help (though not essential) if attendees have some prior programming experience in another language, e.g. Python.

Thursday 11 January 2018

09:30
Office 365, Office Online and OneDrive: An introduction [Places] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

Confused between Office 365 and OneDrive and Office Online? Want a clear explanation of these and help getting started? Then this course is for you.

After a short presentation there will be the opportunity to set up your Office 365 account and use Office Online. You can try the new online applications such as Sway, Yammer or Forms and collaborate with others using online documents. Also bring your own device if you would like to get support installing the applications or working online away from your desk.

To participate in the course activities, if you have not already done so, you will need enable your account by synchronising your UIS Password with your University Microsoft account. Please do this at least one day before the class.

14:00
Programming Concepts: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (1 of 2) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming, or who have never been formally taught the principles and basic concepts of programming. It provides an introduction to the basic concepts common to most high level languages (including Python, Java, Fortran, C, C++, Visual Basic). The aim of the course is to equip attendees with the background knowledge and confidence necessary to tackle many on-line and printed programming tutorials. It may also help attendees in deciding which programming language is suitable for their programming task.

Knowledge of the concepts presented in this course is a pre-requisite for many of the other courses in the Scientific Computing series of courses (although not for the "Python for Absolute Beginners" course).

Friday 12 January 2018

14:00
Programming Concepts: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (2 of 2) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming, or who have never been formally taught the principles and basic concepts of programming. It provides an introduction to the basic concepts common to most high level languages (including Python, Java, Fortran, C, C++, Visual Basic). The aim of the course is to equip attendees with the background knowledge and confidence necessary to tackle many on-line and printed programming tutorials. It may also help attendees in deciding which programming language is suitable for their programming task.

Knowledge of the concepts presented in this course is a pre-requisite for many of the other courses in the Scientific Computing series of courses (although not for the "Python for Absolute Beginners" course).

Tuesday 16 January 2018

09:30
Excel 2016: Introduction [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

Microsoft Excel is the chosen spreadsheet package as it is a popular choice, both on Apple Mac and PC. This is an instructor-led course for absolute beginners. There is a self-paced Excel Beginners course for those who prefer to learn at their own pace.

Wednesday 17 January 2018

09:30
Python 3: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (1 of 4) [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming and provides an introduction to programming using Python, focussing on scientific programming. This course is probably unsuitable for those with programming experience, even if it is just in shell scripting or Matlab-like programs. By the end of this course, attendees should be able to write simple Python programs and to understand more complex Python programs written by others.

As this course is part of the Scientific Computing series, the examples chosen are of most relevance to scientific programming.

10:30
Drupal: An Introduction (Department of Computer Science and Technology) [Places] 10:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course will cover the most essential features and concepts of Drupal Content Management Service through hands on activities.

14:00
C++: Programming in Modern C++ (3 of 6) [Full] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This is an introduction to programming in modern C++, based on the book "'Programming: Principles and Practice using C++"' (2nd ed.) by Bjarne Stroustrup. The aim is to teach participants how to write non trivial, practical programs that are comprehensible and portable. Participants should also be able to understand and modify most well-written C++ applications, though not necessarily every aspect of them.

C++ is a large and complicated language, which is reflected in the length of this course. The creator of C++, Prof. Stroustrup, estimates that newcomers to programming will have to devote in excess of 200 hours' of work to learn how to program in C++ properly. Please bear that in mind if signing up for the course. It would also be of help (though not essential) if attendees have some prior programming experience in another language, e.g. Python.

Unix: Introduction to the Command Line Interface (Self-paced) (1 of 2) [Full] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

The course is designed to take someone from having no knowledge of the Unix command line to being able to navigate around directories, and doing simple file manipulation. Then some of the more basic commands, will be introduced, including information on how to get more help from the system itself. Finally accessing remote computers by ssh and the most basic of shell scripts will be introduced.

Thursday 18 January 2018

09:00
Relational Database Design [Places] 09:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course gives a simple introduction to organizing your data in a relational database. It aims to explain the arranging of your data. It does not deal with specific relational databases systems such as Access, Oracle or SQL Server, or the technical tools that you would or could use to set up your database. The course aims to provide you with enough information to sit down and design your database, regardless of the database product that you intend to use. Exercises will be done on paper, without using computers.

14:00
Unix: Introduction to the Command Line Interface (Self-paced) (2 of 2) [Full] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

The course is designed to take someone from having no knowledge of the Unix command line to being able to navigate around directories, and doing simple file manipulation. Then some of the more basic commands, will be introduced, including information on how to get more help from the system itself. Finally accessing remote computers by ssh and the most basic of shell scripts will be introduced.

Friday 19 January 2018

09:30
Python 3: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (2 of 4) [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming and provides an introduction to programming using Python, focussing on scientific programming. This course is probably unsuitable for those with programming experience, even if it is just in shell scripting or Matlab-like programs. By the end of this course, attendees should be able to write simple Python programs and to understand more complex Python programs written by others.

As this course is part of the Scientific Computing series, the examples chosen are of most relevance to scientific programming.

Visio 2016: Organisational, Gantt and Flowcharts [Standby] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Roger Needham Building, Ely Training Room 1

This course is designed for users new to the software who need to create various types of chart including Organisational charts, Gantt charts and Flow charts. The skills and knowledge acquired in this course are sufficient to be able to use and operate the software at an efficient level and covers from beginners to intermediate skills. It is fast paced.

Tuesday 23 January 2018

10:00
EndNote: Introduction to a Reference Management Program (Self-paced) [Places] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

An introduction to using the bibliography program EndNote to store references and notes and use them to achieve correct referencing in your documents without re-typing. This course covers both EndNote Desktop and the free, browser based, "lite" version, EndNote Online.

Using EndNote will enable you to keep a note of references as you research online so that you will always be able to document your sources correctly. It can save you time as you should never need to retype references and you can alter their layout with a couple of mouse-clicks.

Wednesday 24 January 2018

09:30
Python 3: Introduction for Absolute Beginners (3 of 4) [Full] 09:30 - 13:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This course is part of the Scientific Computing series.

This course is aimed at those new to programming and provides an introduction to programming using Python, focussing on scientific programming. This course is probably unsuitable for those with programming experience, even if it is just in shell scripting or Matlab-like programs. By the end of this course, attendees should be able to write simple Python programs and to understand more complex Python programs written by others.

As this course is part of the Scientific Computing series, the examples chosen are of most relevance to scientific programming.

10:00
LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (1 of 2) [Standby] 10:00 - 13:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

14:00
C++: Programming in Modern C++ (4 of 6) [Full] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Titan Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

This is an introduction to programming in modern C++, based on the book "'Programming: Principles and Practice using C++"' (2nd ed.) by Bjarne Stroustrup. The aim is to teach participants how to write non trivial, practical programs that are comprehensible and portable. Participants should also be able to understand and modify most well-written C++ applications, though not necessarily every aspect of them.

C++ is a large and complicated language, which is reflected in the length of this course. The creator of C++, Prof. Stroustrup, estimates that newcomers to programming will have to devote in excess of 200 hours' of work to learn how to program in C++ properly. Please bear that in mind if signing up for the course. It would also be of help (though not essential) if attendees have some prior programming experience in another language, e.g. Python.

Excel 2016: Introduction (Self-paced) (1 of 2) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

Microsoft Excel is the chosen spreadsheet package as it is a popular choice, both on Macintosh and PC. This is a self-paced Excel Beginners course for those who prefer to learn at their own pace, there is an instructor present to support you if you have questions. The same course is taught as instructor-led for those who prefer this approach to learning Excel Introduction .

Word 2016: Introduction (Self-paced) (1 of 2) Not bookable 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This self-paced practical course covers the most commonly used features of Microsoft Word and is suited to complete beginners or those with limited experience of using a word processor.

LaTeX: Introduction to Text Processing (2 of 2) [Standby] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 2, New Museums Site

LaTeX is a powerful document description language built on top of TeX. It is available on Unix, Windows and Macintoshes. It can be used for the presentation of plain text (including accented characters and letters outside the English alphabet), the typesetting of mathematics, the generation of tables, and producing simple diagrams. It is particularly suited for the writing of theses, papers and technical documents.

Thursday 25 January 2018

09:30
Access 2016: Creating a Simple Database (1 of 2) [Places] 09:30 - 12:30 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This is an introduction to the popular database package Microsoft Access. The course is aimed at those who have never used the package before or have just started using it. There is an Access Fast Track course that is a shortened version of this course for those who learn at a faster pace.

14:00
Excel 2016: Introduction (Self-paced) (2 of 2) [Places] 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

Microsoft Excel is the chosen spreadsheet package as it is a popular choice, both on Macintosh and PC. This is a self-paced Excel Beginners course for those who prefer to learn at their own pace, there is an instructor present to support you if you have questions. The same course is taught as instructor-led for those who prefer this approach to learning Excel Introduction .

Word 2016: Introduction (Self-paced) (2 of 2) Not bookable 14:00 - 17:00 University Information Services, Phoenix Teaching Room 1, New Museums Site

This self-paced practical course covers the most commonly used features of Microsoft Word and is suited to complete beginners or those with limited experience of using a word processor.